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The Plus

GAUSTADVEGEN, NORWAY

The Plus

GAUSTADVEGEN, NORWAY

2022

CLIENT

Vestre A/S

TYPOLOGY

Infrastructure

SIZE M2/FT2

7,000 / 75,000

STATUS

COMPLETED

Designed for furniture manufacturer Vestre, The Plus is a factory, visitor center, and 300-acre park located in Magnor, Norway near Vestre’s HQ and steel factory. Norway’s single largest investment in the furniture industry in decades, the 7,000 m2 production facility is dedicated to the cleanest carbon-neutral fabrication of urban furniture in the world.

 

Constructed in just 18 months, the building is made of local mass timber, low-carbon concrete, and recycled steel, and is set to become the first industrial building to achieve the highest environmental BREEAM Outstanding rating. The factory doubles as a public park for hiking and camping and aligns with the region’s mission to establish a green manufacturing hub outside of Oslo.

The Plus is conceived as a radial array of four main production halls – a warehouse, color factory, wood factory, and the assembly – that connect at the center and generate the ‘plus’ shape at its intersection. The layout enables an efficient, flexible, and transparent workflow between the manufacturing units and an intuitive visitor experience.

 

Like a flowchart, the entire interior is organized with the color of each machine overflowing to the floors. Exploring The Plus feels like moving through an archipelago of colorful islands where the experience and overview of the factory’s activities are unified.

 

Inside the factories, each wing has one alternating ceiling corner lifted to create inclined roofs that allow views into the production halls as well as the forest outside. Along the color and wood factory, the sloping roofs are extended to form a pathway for visitors and staff to hike up and down the building while observing the production processes inside. All four production units are built with 21 m free-spanning, cross-laminated timber, creating flexible column freespaces 

"The radical transparency invites visitors and hikers to enjoy the whole process of creation while providing Vestre’s team with the thrill of working in the middle of the forest. To us, The Plus is a crystal-clear example of Hedonistic Sustainability - showing us how our sustainable future will not only be better for the environment, but also more beautiful to work in and more fun to visit."

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

From all four sides of the buildings, visitors and staff will be invited to hike around the facility and end their walk on the roof. Here, 900 photovoltaic panels are placed and angled according to optimal solar efficiency while effective construction and materials methods, rainwater collection systems, heat and cooling systems, green roofs, and electric vehicles contribute to ca 90% lower energy demand than that of a conventional factory. An ADA-accessible ramp will allow wheelchairs and strollers to enjoy the serpentine path and the experience of being surrounded by pine trees on all sides.  

 

All materials were carefully selected for their environmental impact, with the façade constructed from local timber, low-carbon concrete, and recycled reinforcement steel.
Every aspect of the design is based on principles of renewable and clean energy to match Vestre’s eco-friendly production, such as ensuring a minimum of 50% lower greenhouse gas emissions than comparable factories.

The heart of The Plus draws visitors into the exhibition centers Vestre Energy and Clean Water Center where the public can learn about energy, water and circular design. A logistics office with direct connections to all four production halls allows Vestre’s team to process logistical traffic with maximum efficiency. The central hub wraps around a public, circular courtyard where the latest outdoor furniture collections are displayed  according to the changing seasons. The courtyard doubles as a panopticon for visitors and staff to fully experience the factory’s production processes. 

"Playfulness, democracy, and sustainability are at the heart of the Vestre brand and everything they do; our wooden, colorful factory in the middle of the Norwegian woods - surrounded by a 300,000 m2 public forest park where the local community can come to experience the gigantic Vestre furniture pieces sprinkled throughout - lives and breathes this philosophy."

David Zahle — Partner, BIG

Proving that production can be sustainable and profitable even in a high-cost country like Norway, The Plus – a hybrid of a transparent and open production facility, a public park, and a literal green landmark for the manufacturing industry – exemplifies how advancements in fabrication and manufacturing can help shape both the factories of the future, and the way we experience them. 

Bjarke Ingels David Zahle Ole Elkjær-Larsen Agnieszka Wardzińska Alexander Jacobson Andrea Hektor Andy Coward Ariana Ribas Ariana Szmedra Bjarke Koch-Ørvad Camille Breuil Cæcilie Søs Brandt-Olsen Claudia Bertolotti Duncan Horswill Eduardo Javier Sosa Trevino Eva Seo-Andersen Ewa Zapiec Filip Fot Frederic Lucien Engasser Frederik Skou Jensen Jens Majdal Kaarsholm Jesper Kanstrup Petersen Julia Novaes Tabet Julien Bernard Jacques Picard Julius Victor Schneevoigt Kaoan Hengles De Lima Katrine Juul Katrine Sandstrøm Kristoffer Negendahl Ksenia Zhitomirskaya Luca Pileri Magni Waltersson Miles Treacy Nanna Gyldholm Møller Neringa Jurkonyte Ningnan Ye Palita Tungjaroen Paula Madrid Rron Bexheti Steen Kortbæk Svendsen Thor Larsen-Lechuga Tobias Hjortdal Tommy Bjørnstrup Tore Banke Tristan Harvey Ulla Hornsyld Viktoria Millentrup Xingyue Huang Zuzanna Eugenia Montwill Ákos Márk Horváth Jean-Sébastien Pagnon Andreas Bak Cheng-Huang Lin Giulia Frittoli Sui King Yu Jenna Hukkinen Marcel Götz Jonas Rask Edward Durie

COLLABORATORS

Bollinger+Grohmann
Gade & Mortensen
Nordic Architects AS
Asplan Viak
Erichsen og Horgen AS
Norconsult AS
Foyn Consult AS
Fokus Rådgivning
Multiconsult AS
ØM Fjeld AS
Woodcon AS
Reflex
Hallas AS
Loe VVS Prosjekt AS
Cowi AS
Fokus Rad AS
Melby Maskin AS
EMV Construction AS
YC ROR AS
Energima Prosjekt SA
Minel Elinstallasjon US
Solcellespesialisten AS
TKS Heiser AS
Bygganalyse AS
Evotek AS

The Twist

JEVNAKER, NORWAY

The Twist

JEVNAKER, NORWAY

2019

CLIENT

Kistefos Museum Jevnaker

TYPOLOGY

Culture

SIZE M2/FT2

1,000 / 10,764

STATUS

COMPLETED

The Twist is a contemporary art museum situated in the Kistefos Sculpture Park, located around a one hour drive from Oslo. The sculpture park, built around an old paper mill, occupies both embankments of the Randselva river and features sculptures by Olafur Eliasson, Lynda Benglis, Yayoi Kusama, Jeppe Hein, and Anish Kapoor, among others.

 

BIG was invited to design an intimate art museum to transform the visitor experience and add 1,000 m2 of indoor exhibition space to the park. After a careful study of the site, BIG proposed a raw and simple sculptural building across the Randselva river to tie the area together and create a natural circulation for a continuous art tour through the park.

 

Completed in 2019, The Twist is conceived as a beam, warped 90 degrees to create a sculptural form within the park and connect the two riverbanks: a museum, bridge and sculpture in one.

"The Twist is a hybrid spanning several traditional categories: it’s a museum, it’s a bridge, it’s an inhabitable sculpture. As a bridge, it reconfigures the sculpture park turning the journey through the park into a continuous loop. As a museum it connects two distinct spaces - an introverted vertical gallery and an extraverted horizontal gallery with panoramic views across the river. A third space is created through the blatant translation between these two galleries creating the namesake twist. The resultant form becomes another sculpture among the sculptures of the park."

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

The museum is placed as an abstract shape in the landscape. Its sculptural form is spanning between perfect geometry and specific bridge technology: on one side, it’s a simple box structure; on the other side, it’s a huge warping sculpture. A simple twist in the building volume allows the bridge to lift from the relatively lower forested area towards the south, and up to the hillside area in the north.

 

As a continuous path in the landscape, both sides of the building serve as the main entrance. From the south entry, visitors cross a 16 m aluminum-clad steel bridge to reach the double-height space, with a clear view to the north end, similarly linked with a 9 m pedestrian bridge.

The double-curve geometry of the museum is comprised of straight 40 cm-wide aluminum panels arranged like a stack of books, shifted ever so slightly in a fanning motion. The same principle is used inside, with white painted 8 cm-wide fir slats cladding the floor, wall, and ceiling as one uniform backdrop for Kistefos’ short-term Norwegian and international exhibitions.

 

The museum is comprised of a series of generic gallery spaces where, due to the curved form of the glass windows, the variety of daylight entering the museum creates three distinctive galleries. Stacked vertical, dark galleries with artificial lighting are found to the south, and a large horizontal, naturally-lit gallery with panoramic views is located on the north side. In between these spaces is the sculptural gesture, creating a twisted sliver of roof light.

From either direction, visitors experience the twisted gallery as though walking through a camera shutter. The ability to compartmentalize, divide, or merge the gallery spaces creates flexibility for Kistefos’ artistic programming.

 

The main entrance to the building is from the south, with the information center and visitor facilities such as a cloak and locker room, museum shop, and restrooms located nearby. From this entrance, there is a clear view to the other end of the building, including the sloping gallery which is located along the main circulation ramp – guiding visitors to the panoramic gallery.

 

The panoramic gallery is a large open space suitable for sculptures and large installations, with the ability to be subdivided for special occasions and events. On the north end, a full-height glass wall offering panoramic views to the pulp mill and river tapers while curving upwards to form a 25 cm-wide strip of skylight. A café is situated at this end of the gallery, where guests can enjoy snacks while taking in the view of the historic pulp mill and surrounding landscape. During the summer months, the café service area spills onto the plateau just outside.

A glass stairway leads down to the museum’s lower level on the north river embankment, where the building’s aluminum underside becomes the ceiling for the basement and restroom area. Another full-width glass wall brings visitors even closer to the river below, enhancing the overall immersive experience of being in the idyllic woodlands just outside of Oslo.

 

The art delivery and reception area is shared with the main entrance. Art can be delivered discreetly and securely after hours, and the art shipping crates are stored in the exhibition storage room once the art has been installed in its respective gallery.

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær David Zahle Jakob Lange Brian Yang Catherine Huang Ole Elkjær-Larsen Casey Tucker Aimee Louise Desert Alberto Menegazzo Aleksandra Domian Alessandro Zanini Andre Enrico Cassettari Zanolla Brage Hult Carlos Ramos Tenorio Channam Lei Christian Eugenius Kuczynski Claus Rytter Bruun de Neergaard Dag Præstegaard Edda Steingrimsdottir Espen Vik Eva Seo-Andersen Frederik Lyng Joanna M. Lesna Kamilla Heskje Katrine Juul Kekoa Charlot Kei Atsumi Kristoffer Negendahl Lasse Lyhne-Hansen Lone Fenger Albrechtsen Mads Mathias Pedersen Mael Joseph Jaques Barbe Martino Hutz Matteo Dragone Maxime Le Droupeet Mikkel Marcker Stubgaard Naysan John Foroudi Nick Adriaan Huizenga Norbert Nadudvari Ovidiu Munteanu Rasmus Rosenblad Rihards Dzelme Roberto Fabbri Ryohei Koike Sofiia Rokhmaniko Steen Kortbæk Svendsen Sunwoong Choi Tomas Karl Ramstrand Tommy Bjørnstrup Tore Banke Tyrone Cobcroft Ulla Hornsyld Xin Chen Carlos Suriñach Penella Alina Tamosiunaite Balaj Alin IIulian Christian Dahl David Tao Marcelina Kolasinska Richard Mui Tiina Liisa Juuti Ola Sobczyk

AWARDS

LCD Berlin Leading Culture Destinations of the Year Award, 2020


Building Awards International Project of the Year, 2020

Architizer A+ Awards Architecture + Engineering Jury Winner, 2020

Architizer A+ Awards Gallery & Exhibitions Jury and Popular Winner, 2020

COLLABORATORS

AKT II
ÅF-Belysning
AS Byggeanalyse
Baumetall/Zambelli Group
Bladt Industries
Brekke & Strand
David Langdon
DIFK
ECT
Element Arkitekter
Erichsen & Horgen
Fokus Rådgivning
GCAM
Grindaker
Lüchinger&Meyer
Max Fordham
MIR
Rambøll
BIG Ideas

Stellar Nebula

Stellar Nebula Lamps

ARTEMIDE

CLIENT

Artemide

TYPOLOGY

Products

STATUS

COMPLETED

Stellar Nebula is a family of lamps designed to interpret and enhance artisanal glass blowing with innovative PVD finishing techniques.

 

Values, roles and limits of industrial and artisanal production are the core of this project idea, which aims to find a solution of industrial uniqueness.

 

The shapes of the hand blown diffusers are always unique. The suspension has three different sizes while the floor, table, ceiling and clusters are only in the medium one.

 

Buy the Stellar Nebula lamp

Bjarke Ingels Jakob Lange Erik Kreider Joshua Woo

Audemars Piguet Hotel

LE BRASSUS, SWITZERLAND

Audemars Piguet Hotel

LE BRASSUS, SWITZERLAND

2022

CLIENT

Audemars Piguet

TYPOLOGY

Hospitality

SIZE M2/FT2

7,000 / 75,347

STATUS

COMPLETED

Watchmaking, architecture, and nature are celebrated at Hôtel des Horlogers which zigzags through the Vallée de Joux town just outside of Geneva. The 8,700 m2 hotel marks the second collaboration between BIG and luxury watchmaker Audemars Piguet following the opening of the neighboring Musée Atelier Audemars Piguet in 2020. 

 

The Hôtel des Horlogers builds on the history of the Hôtel de France, established in Le Brassus in 1857 by members of the Audemars Piguet family. The hotel became an important stop on the Chemin des Horlogers – the watchmaking route that connected the Vallée de Joux workshops to Geneva, where timepieces were sold by retailers. Audemars Piguet hired BIG to design a new hotel in line with the luxury brand’s values and sustainability mission. 

Guided to the hotel entrance from the main access road, guests approach the hotel through a generous driveway. From this entrance, the hotel appears as a single slab, with the four additional floors tucked into the landscape below. Defined by timber and concrete, the exterior entrance introduces the materiality of the hotel-at-large – authentic, pared-back materials that complement the natural landscape enveloping the building. 

 

The system of interwoven wood louvers inspired by the log cabin overlay aesthetic provides shading for the façade, enhancing the building’s energy performance. The shading system is fully integrated with the stepping geometry of the wooden slabs, keeping the transparency from the main access road to the valley, and re-establishing the connection between the village and the pastoral landscape. 

The hotel’s interior design scheme, led by AU*M, draws inspiration from the architecture’s indoor/outdoor vernacular – created through the architecture’s tilting slabs that provide the interior spaces with framed views of the surrounding valley. As guests transition from the main entrance into the reception area, the visual language becomes more sinuous and rustic, with materials such as glass, concrete, stone, and wood blurring the delineation of the constructed and the natural.  

One level below the entry, a spa, conference center, and two restaurants are orientated towards the valley – providing sweeping views and natural light while also acting as individual destinations along the continuous interior path. Giving pride of place to gastronomy, the Hôtel des Horlogers’ restaurants are overseen by three-Michelin-starred French Chef, Emmanuel Renaut.

On the interior, the building’s five slab-layout forms a single, continuous ramping corridor – connecting the interior programs and facilitating both guest and service circulation. This layout also provides all guestrooms with views of the surrounding Risoud Forest.  

Certified Minergie-ECO, a label for new and refurbished low-energy consumption buildings, the hotel addresses the local ecological and social sustainability requirements to reduce its environmental impactfrom the building’s design and construction to its day-to-day operations. Similarly, the hotel is equipped with 86 photovoltaic panels that provide part of the building’s energy needs. 

The zigzagging slabs gradually descend towards the valley, tilting slightly to embrace the site and create a visual path between nature and architecture. While the Audemars Piguet museum located just steps away defines a visitor experience inspired by the centripetal and centrifugal forces of time through the spiral form, the hotel welcomes its guests into the ‘time’ journey by reimagining the historic winding watchmakers’ trail that the region is known for.  

Bjarke Ingels Thomas Christoffersen Daniel Sundlin Beat Schenk Jason Wu Haochen Yu Jan Leenknegt Gil Kilmo Kang Melissa Jones Morgan Mangelsen Otilia Pupezeanu Simon Scheller Terrence Chew Tracy Sodder Veronica Watson Casey Tucker Deb Campbell Francesca Portesine Ji-Young Yoon Aaron Mark Amro Abdelsalam Aurelie Frolet Catalina Rivera Rothgaenger Claire Wadey Claire Thomas Spiller Derek Wong Ethan Duffey Eva Maria Mikkelsen Evan Wiskup Gaurav Janey Ibrahim Salman Il Hwan Kim Ku Hun Chung Lu Zhang Malcolm Rondell Galang Manon Otto Martynas Norvila Matthew Oravec Nicolas Gustin Nicolas Lapierre Pantea Tehrani Pascal Loschetter Phawin Siripong Teodor Javanaud Emden Rasmus Streboel Seth Byrum Shidi Fu Sijia Zhou Stephanie Choi Supakrit Wongviboonsin Xinyu Wang Josiah Poland Karolina Bouros Lou Arencibia Rune Hansen Yvette Liu

AWARDS

World Luxury Hotel Awards: Continent Winner - Luxury Design Hotel, 2022


World Architecture Festival Future Hospitality Category Winner, 2019

BUILD’s 2018 Global Excellence for Future Leisure Project of the Year, 2018

COLLABORATORS

CCHE Architecture
Ingphi SA
Pierre Chuard Ingenieurs-Conseils SA
Sorane SA
Duchein SA
MAB-Ingineurs SA
Ignis Salutem
EcoAcoustique SA
Alterego Concept SA
Jean Pitteloud
Thorens et associes SA
Societe Denogent

A. P. Moller Terminals Aqaba

AQABA, JORDAN

Aqaba Port Terminal

AQABA, JORDAN

CLIENT

APM Terminals Management BV

TYPOLOGY

Infrastructure

STATUS

IN DESIGN

APM Terminals and Maersk teamed with BIG to reimagine the future of the shipping industry starting with the green transformation of the Aqaba Port Terminal in Jordan by 2040. The project is the first step towards decarbonization of major ports and container terminals – and connecting shipping infrastructure to local communities.

 

Born out of APM Terminal’s ambition to optimize and decarbonize the port and surrounding logistics, BIG has developed a spatial framework for the green transformation of Aqaba Container Terminal – the gateway to the distribution network of Jordan, the Levant and beyond. The vision, with ESG principles at the core, merges different strategic approaches at regional scale, starting from the terminal refurbishment, expanding to the logistics functions in the immediate surroundings, and lastly, connecting to the wider port’s community and natural environment.

“Over the last decades, industries have driven economic growth, but also contributed to severe environmental impact. Aqaba Container Terminal is an example of how cleaner, quieter and safer infrastructure can create new forms of sustainable urban environments. As an urban planner and landscape architect the collaboration has been a unique chance to explore the hidden potential behind industrial sites and rethink infrastructure as a catalyst for urban, sustainable transformation. Developing this vision in collaboration with Maersk, APM Terminals and ACT has been an incredible opportunity to collaborate with industry leaders on the design and innovation of the global maritime infrastructure, which we all rely greatly on."

Giulia Frittoli — Partner, BIG

The framework for transforming Aqaba Container Terminal aims to bring life back to the port. This is done by decarbonizing its infrastructure, creating new synergies with local businesses and communities, and incorporating strategies for environmental restoration and nature-based solutions. Considering increasing safety and operational efficiency, which is core to APMT, BIG’s planning approach connects social, economic and environmental strategies into a holistic vision, for the terminal and beyond. 

The future Aqaba Container Terminal incorporates solar installations and canopies, which allow for zero-emission port functions and reliance on fully electrified cranes, vehicles and charging stations. Yard refurbishments with state-of-the-art technology and sustainable pavement treatment provides efficient operations while creating comfortable spaces for workers.  

 

By relocating the custom facility closer to the port, the clearance process is optimized and directly linked to nearby logistic facilities – an area where trade opportunities will be offered to the wider economy by connecting with local businesses. Bringing together agents and shippers will ensure faster goods distribution, while training and innovation centers develop Jordan’s next generation of logistics professionals.  

Bjarke Ingels Shane Dalke Filip Radu Jakub Wlodarczyk Giulia Frittoli Tania-Cristina Farcas Daniel Joshua Vanderhorst

COLLABORATORS

Dimitrie

CapitaSpring

SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

CapitaSpring

SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

2022

CLIENT

CapitaLand Group

TYPOLOGY

Work, Hospitality

SIZE M2/FT2

93,351 / 1,004,830

STATUS

COMPLETED

The 280 m tall CapitaSpring is located in the heart of Singapore’s financial district on the site of a 1980s car complex and a hawkers market. As the second tallest tower in Singapore, the 93,000 m2, 51 story mixed-use development continues Singapore’s pioneering vertical urbanism by creating a diverse neighborhood of places to work, live, and play.

 

Entirely defined by zoning rules, street walls, and setback requirements, the volume is a complex composition of polygonal shapes. The program, which includes premium Grade A office space, Citadines serviced residences, retail, and public spaces, is similarly strictly defined with offices sitting on top of residences that in turn rest on a podium of food markets and parking.

Due to the unique character of Singapore’s urbanism – both very dense and verdant – BIG pursued the design challenge as a vertical exploration of tropical urbanism, reinforcing Singapore’s reputation as a garden city. The building’s recognizable exterior façade consists of vertical elements that are pulled apart to allow glimpses into the green oases blooming from the base, core and rooftop. A dynamic interplay of orthogonal lines and lush greenery presents itself in the contrasting textures of steel and glass, interweaved with tropical vegetation.

At the ground floor, visitors are met by a new linear public rainforest plaza and park. Meandering garden paths and covered passages create natural entryways into the City Room, a 19 m high generous open space at the foot of the tower.

Nestled on the second and third levels of CapitaSpring is the new hawker market with 56 food stalls offering local delicacies and an abundance of lunch options for the CBD’s workers.

 

The first eight floors of the tower contain 299 serviced residences with a wide range of amenities – a swimming pool, jacuzzi, jogging track, gym, social kitchen, lounges, and barbeque pits.

 

A vertical park is inserted in the middle of the tower in the form of a spiraling promenade ascending among tropical tree trunks and canopies.

"As someone with Singaporean heritage, I have been honored and humbled by the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing evolution of architecture in Singapore as a distinct blending between the contemporary and the tropical. In our design, this manifests as a seamless transition between the garden and the city, articulated in the facades and a series of lush spiraling gardens connecting between various programs and amenities."

Brian Yang — Partner, BIG

The top 29 floors of the tower offer premium office spaces with panoramic views of the Singapore River and Marina Bay. At the core of the building between the hardscapes of the offices and residences are four connected levels of organic softscape, called the Green Oasis – a mesmerizing 30 m open-air garden for work, casual strolls, relaxation, exercise and events.

CapitaSpring’s rooftop garden is home to 1-Arden Food Forest. Currently, over 150 species of fruits, vegetables, herbs, and flowers, are grown across five thematic plots to supply the building’s restaurants with fresh greens.

Bjarke Ingels Jakob Lange Brian Yang Aimee Louise Desert Aleksandra Domian Alessandro Zanini Anders Holden Deleuran Anke Kristina Schramm Antonio Sollo Augusto Lavieri Zamperlini Bartosz Kobylakiewicz Dalma Ujvari Davide Tarditi David Schwarzman David Vega y Rojo Dimitrie Grigorescu Dina Brændstrup Dominika Trybe Eric Li Elise Cauchard Eriko Maekawa Espen Vik Ewa Natalia Szajda Federica Locati Filippo Lorenzi Francisco Castellanos Teodor Cristian Fratila Frederik Skou Jensen Gorka Calzada Medina Cris Guoyu Liu Helen Shuyang Chen Hongduo Zhou Jacek Baczkowski Jakub Wlodarczyk Joseph James Haberl Julieta Muzzillo Kirsty Badenoch Kristoffer Negendahl Luca Pileri Luis Wagenführer Martino Hutz Matilde Tavanti Moa Carlsson Nataly Timotheou Niu Jing Orges Guga Patrycja Lyszczyk Philip Rufus Knauf Praewa Samachai Qamelliah Yusuph Nassir Rahul Girish Rebecca Carrai Roberto Fabbri Ryohei Koike Samuel Rubio Sanchez Shuhei Kamiya Sofiia Rokhmaniko Song He Sorcha Burke Steen Kortbæk Svendsen Szymon Kolecki Talia Fatte Tore Banke Ulla Hornsyld Viktoria Millentrup Vinish Sethi Weijia Lu Xinying Zhang Zari Van de Merwe Günther Edwin Weber Aleksander Wadas Gabrielė Ubarevičiūtė Jonas Käckenmester Lukas Kerner Maria Teresa Fernandez Rojo Pedro Savio jobim Pinheiro Ramon Julio Muros Cortes Vilius Linge Xin Su Zhen Tong Andrew Lo Malgorzata Mutkowska

COLLABORATORS

Carlo Ratti Associati
RSP Architects
Dragages Singapore
COEN
BIG Ideas
BIG Landscape

Google Masterplan

MOUNTAIN VIEW, UNITED STATES

Google HQ

MOUNTAIN VIEW, UNITED STATES

2022

CLIENT

Google

TYPOLOGY

Urbanism

SIZE M2/FT2

350,000 / 3,767,368

STATUS

COMPLETED

Google Bay View is Google’s first-ever ground-up campus with the mission to operate on carbon-free energy 24 hours a day, seven days a week by 2030.  The buildings deliver on Google’s ambition to create human-centric, sustainable innovations for the future of Google’s workplace and scalable, replicable solutions for the construction industry and beyond.

 

Located on a 42-acre site at the NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, the 1.1 million sq ft Google Bay View Campus brings three new buildings, 20 acres of open space, a 1,000-person event center, and 240 short-term employee accommodation units to the area. All three buildings are constructed as lightweight canopy structures optimized for interior daylight, views, collaboration, and activities.  

 

Anchored in three themes defined by Google’s design brief at the beginning of the project –  innovation, nature, and community – the design is driven by flexibility and extraordinary user experience that inspires collaboration and co-creation. Team spaces are on the upper level and gathering spaces are below, separating focus and collaborative areas while still providing easy access to both. The second floor design has variation in floorplates to give teams a designated “neighborhood” area that is highly flexible to change with their needs.

 

The site has achieved a LEED-NC v4 Platinum certification – making it the largest LEED v4 BD+C: NC Platinum certified project in the world – and has become the largest facility ever to attain the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge (LBC) Water Petal Certification. 

Bay View operates entirely on electric energy. The integrated geothermal pile system at Bay View, which is the largest in North America, is estimated to reduce carbon emissions by roughly 50% and will help both heat and cool the campus. The massive geoexchange field is integrated into the structural system, reducing the amount of water typically used for cooling by 90%, equal to 5 million gallons of water annually.

 

To help deliver on Google’s commitment to replenish 120% of the water the HQ consumes by 2030, the site is net water-positive with all non-potable water demands being met using the recycled water it generates on site. The on-site systems built by Google collect, treat, and reuse all stormwater and wastewater and provide habitat restoration, sea level rise protection, and access to the beauty of natural wetlands for both Googlers and the public on the nearby Bay Trail.

The long-span canopy (120 ft) rests on cruciform columns which also relay services from the solar roof above. The selection of this structural system allows the entire  workspace to be open and connected under one roof. Access to natural light and views with reduced glare during working hours were priority design elements, achieved through the use of carefully-placed clerestory windows.

 

On the exterior, all three buildings feature a first-of-its-kind “dragonscale” solar skin roof equipped with 50,000 silver solar panels that generate a total of nearly seven megawatts of energy. 

“Our design of the new Bay View campus is the result of an incredibly collaborative design process. Working with a client as data driven as Google has led to an architecture where every single decision is informed by hard information and empirical analysis. The result is a campus where the striking dragonscale solar canopies harvest every photon that hits the buildings; the energy piles store and extract heating and cooling from the ground, and even the naturally beautiful floras are in fact hardworking rootzone gardens that filter and clean the water from the buildings. All in all, a campus where front of house and back of house, technology and architecture, and form and function have been fused into a new and striking hybrid.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

The Bay View buildings are split across only two floors, with desks and team spaces on the upper level, and the amenity spaces below. A series of indoor “courtyards” throughout the buildings connect the two levels, giving teams easy access to cafes, kitchenettes, conference rooms, and all-hands spaces. The courtyards also encourage the physiological benefits of physical movement when circulating between levels and different modes of work, and double as wayfinding devices. 

 

Rather than being segmented by excessive columns and support walls, the structural innovation of the canopy roof allows for a wide-open workspace; every person has equal access to views across the floorplate, and through the perim­eter facade and clerestory windows to the outdoors. 

"Google Bay View offers a workplace experience that is an antithesis to an urban high-rise; Containing as much area as the tallest office tower in San Francisco, the typically stacked floorplates are redistributed into a flat array, creating a vibrant village. While on-site carbon and water neutrality is challenging for skyscrapers, this bay-scraper typology enables us to harvest the power of the sun, earth, and water. We hope Bay View will provide a quantum leap in the evolution of the workplace, elevate the benchmark for sustainable design, and inspire the next generations of users and visitors to the building."

Leon Rost — Partner, BIG

The campus includes 17.3 acres of high-value natural areas – including wet meadows, woodlands, and marsh – that contribute to Google’s broader efforts to reestablish missing essential habitat in the Bay Area.

 

Google’s mission to unlock advancements for the benefit of the environment and the entire industry have led to several scalable solutions in working on the Bay View campus: increasing modular construction, geothermal at new scales, innovation in PV design, a permitted blackwater system, waste diverted from landfill, improved total number of products vetted for Red List ingredients, and landscape designed to advance water stewardship and create valuable habitat for threatened wildlife. 

 

Overall, the Google Bay View campus has forged a new frame­work, materials language, and ecological approach that will help push both the future of the workplace, and the built environment-at-large, forward.  

Bjarke Ingels Thomas Christoffersen Daniel Sundlin Beat Schenk Leon Rost Jakob Lange Agla Egilsdottir Alvaro Velosa Blake Smith Jason Wu Corliss Ng Cristina Medina-Gonzalez David Iseri Erik Kreider Florencia Kratsman Guillaume Evain Isabella Marcotulli Jan Leenknegt Linus Saavedra Veronica Acosta Melissa Jones Michelle Stromsta Otilia Pupezeanu Patrick Hyland Pauline Lavie-Luong Rita Sio Ryan Harvey Ryan Duval Sebastian Claussnitzer Seo Young Shin Shane Dalke Shu Zhao Siva Sepehry Nejad Terrence Chew Thomas McMurtrie Tracy Sodder Xi Zhang Zhonghan Huang Ziad Shehab Deb Campbell Dylan Hames Isela Liu Ji-Young Yoon Jeremy Alain Siegel Aaron Mark Alan Tansey Alessandra Peracin Alice Cladet Andriani Atmadja Anton Bashkaev Armen Menendian Athena Morella Barbara Stallone Benson Chien Bernard Peng Brian Zhang Camilo Francisco Aspeny Inostroza Jia Chengzhen Cheyne Owens Christi Farrell Christopher Wilson Claire Thomas Spiller Cristian Lera Silva Danielle Kemble David Spittler Derek Wong Diandian Li Douglass Alligood Eva Maria Mikkelsen Filip Milovanovic Gabriel Hernandez Solano Gabriella Den Elzen Gaurav Sardana Helen Shuyang Chen Jennifer Dudgeon Jennifer Kimura Jennifer Wood Jian Yong Khoo John Hilmes Jonathan Fournier Joshua Burns Joshua Plourde Juan David Ramirez Julien Beauchamp-Roy Kalina Pilat Kiley Anne Feickert Kristoffer Negendahl Kurt Nieminen Lina Bondarenko Ludwig Ebert Mads Kjaer Mahsa Malek Manon Otto Marcus Kujala Mirco Amstad Mo Zhou Nandi Lu Nicole Passarella Olga Khuraskina Oliver Colman Omer Hadar Pablo Costa Fraiz Pantea Tehrani Patricia Correa Velasquez Peter Kwak Ramona Montecillo Simon David Taylor Fulton Tiago Sá Timothy Cheng Tingting Lyu Tore Banke Valentina Mele Valentino Vitacca Vincenzo Polsinelli Walid Bhatt Ye Sul Cho Yina Moore Ali Chen Ania Agnieszka Podlaszewska Benjamin Caldwell Domenic Schmid Dong-Joo Kim Hacken Li Jonathan Pan Luke Lu Sebastian Grogaard

COLLABORATORS

Heatherwick Studios
SERA/Studios
AKT
Atelier Ten
Front
Eckersley O’Callaghan
ARUP
EKI
CMG
Sandis
Sherwood
ESA
Urban Tree Management
Cumming
HT Harvey
SFEI
Iris
MIR
Dbox
Squint Opera
BIG Ideas

Zurich Airport Dock A

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND

Zurich Airport Building Dock A

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND

CLIENT

Zurich Airport

TYPOLOGY

Infrastructure

SIZE M2/FT2

140,000 / 1,506,947

STATUS

IN DESIGN

Since its opening in the 1950’s, Zurich Airport has become one of the most important aviation hubs in Europe. Following the airport’s previous additions of Dock E, the Airside Center, and The Circle, an international two-stage design competition was kicked off in 2020 to replace the aging Dock A.

 

Expected to open in 10 years, the new Dock A designed by BIG includes Schengen and Non-Schengen gates, airside retail, lounges, offices, the new air traffic control tower, and an extension of the immigration hall. BIG’s design is conceived as a mass timber space frame that is structural design, spatial experience, architectural finish, and organizational principle in one. The  structure is made from locally sourced timber, and the roof is entirely clad in solar shingles turning sunlight into a power source.

Based on BIG’s concept of the ‘Raumfachwerk’ – a robust yet flexible structural framework – the design proposal celebrates the passenger experience and movement through the airport.

 

Located adjacent to the existing Airside Center and Terminal 1, the new Dock A is defined by two main areas: the central hub with shopping, airport services for arriving and departing passengers, and vertical circulation; and the pier with the gates, waiting areas, and the fixed links connecting to the planes.

Arriving passengers are guided towards the hub of Dock A – which is split across seven floors which are visually connected through the generous light-filled atrium. Passenger flows are funneled through the atrium that connects all floors via stairs, escalators and elevators – from the underground immigration hall to all arrival and departure levels, and the lounges on the top floors of the central hub.

 

To enhance the passenger experience, the spaces within the new terminal use daylight as a natural wayfinding system. A linear skylight – created by the unfolding roof of the pier – widens toward the central hub and opens up into the atrium where all departing, arriving, and transferring passengers meet. By placing the control tower in its center, the tower is experienced from the inside as a beacon that creates a sense of place, akin to a town square rather than an airport.

“As airports grow and evolve and as international guidelines and safety requirements change, airports tend to become more and more complex: Frankenstein's of interconnected elements, patches and extensions. For the new main terminal of Zurich Airport, we have attempted to answer this complex challenge with the simplest possible response: A mass timber space frame that is structural design, spatial experience, architectural finish, and organizational principle in one. The striking structure is made from locally sourced timber, and the long sculptural body of the roof is entirely clad in solar shingles turning sunlight into a power source. A simple yet expressive design - rooted in tradition and committed to innovation - embodying the cultural and natural elements of Swiss architecture.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

A contemporary, pared-back material palette, the structure, floors, and ceilings of Dock A are envisioned with timber as the main material. As a renewable local resource, this material choice allows for efficient prefabrication during the construction process while paying homage to the long-standing local tradition of wood construction in Switzerland.

 

The main loadbearing system of the building is based on V-shaped timber columns – providing a structural function while also serving as a reference to both the iconic Swiss alpine landscapes and the centuries-old tradition of timber construction and traditional pitched roofs. Arriving passengers will be welcomed by this distinctly local architecture that showcases high-quality craftmanship while underscoring the airport’s pledge to sustainability.

 

Finally, Dock A’s roof will be covered with PV panels while integrated shading will reduce solar heat gain and maintenance requirements, and a combination of water and air-based cooling and heating systems will improve the building’s energy demand.

Bjarke Ingels Thomas Christoffersen Beat Schenk Martin Voelkle David Holbrook Fabian Lorenz Guillaume Evain Hector Romero Jan Leenknegt Oliver Thomas Paul Clemens Bart Sang Ha Jung Sebastian Claussnitzer Shu Zhao Simon Scheller Sören Grünert Terrence Chew Tracy Sodder Veronica Watson Weronika Siwak Christian Salkeld Jennifer Ng Ji-Young Yoon Bernardo Schuhmacher James Donaldson Ruo Wang Samantha Pires Tom Lasbrey Dong-Joo Kim Juan Diego Perez Don Chen Amie Yao Jaeho Park Ryan Henriksen Shuo Yang Luca McLaughlin Zofia Bednarczyk Gus Steyer Montre'ale Jones Cosmin Paduraru Pearl Cao Ololade Owolabi Bianca Blanari Andrew Haas

COLLABORATORS

BIG
HOK
10:8
Buro Happold
Pirmin Jung Schweiz AG
NACO
Haerter & Partner AG
TLP
B+P Baurealisation
BIQS
Pragma
The Design Solution
Bucharest Studio & Imigo

CityWave

MILAN, ITALY

CityWave

MILAN, ITALY

CLIENT

Generali Real Estate

TYPOLOGY

Work

SIZE M2/FT2

53,500 / 538,200

STATUS

IN CONSTRUCTION

CityLife is one of the largest redevelopment projects in Europe, covering an area of 366,000 m2. Located in a prestigious area of Milan, only a short distance from the Duomo,  CityLife currently consists of three iconic towers surrounded by a green public realm. While an international design competition asked for a new tower on the site, BIG took the opportunity to explore a different typology for the city.

 

Currently under construction, BIG’s design envisions two individual buildings connected by a 140 m long hanging roof, forming a generous shaded public realm as the entrance to CityLife: The Portico, also known as CityWave. Rather than to compete with the existing context, BIG’s design completes it.

CityLife is located on the former site of Fiera Milano. The fair’s primary axis, called Domodossola Axis, was the main pedestrian walkway to the pavilions dividing the site diagonally between Largo Domodossola and Piazza Amendola. This axis is maintained in the CityLife masterplan as a visual connection and further enhanced by the underground metro. BIG’s site acts as an entryway to the axis, split in two parts.

 

Twin buildings were often used in Milan in the 20th century to celebrate the axis as an urban demarcation of entryways. Anchoring both sides of the street, the twin buildings create a sense of grandeur to the axis and are commonly found throughout history, from the Spanish Walla Gates in the 1500s to post-war icons such as the twin buildings of via Turati.

 

CityWave is a 53,500 m2 development with workspace and public amenities, designed on the last two remaining plots of the CityLife masterplan in Milan. The masterplan designed by Studio Libeskind, in conjunction with Zaha Hadid Architects and Arata Isozaki & Associates, consists of three iconic towers surrounded by a green public realm and residential neighborhoods.

"Throughout the urban history of Milan, an urban axis is symbolized by a set of twin buildings and a gate. The Portico is an evolution of that typology creating both a gateway to CityLife and a significant destination for Milan."

Lorenzo Boddi — Partner, BIG

CityWave is an extension of the interior space to the exterior, allowing outdoor life to be enjoyed throughout the year. The characteristic long portico structure is clad entire in PV tiles, forming one of the largest rooftop solar installations in Europe.

 

Two courtyards allow employees to enjoy a place of respite during the workday, while the large, central, covered public realm becomes a gift to the city of Milan.

 

 

“With CityLife, we set ourselves an ambitious goal that we believe we have achieved, that of regenerating and upgrading the area of the Milan Trade Fair, which we have fully restored to the city in a completely renewed form that can be used by everyone. The project of the BIG studio completes the area with a solution that is in line with our values and objectives, a project that we embraced right from the start."

Armando Borghi — CEO, CityLife

Each floor of the building has at least 3 m high ceilings, enabling natural light to enter thanks to a continuous, transparent and luminous façade that will look out onto both the city and two large private courtyards. At the highest part, the buildings will have cascading terraces for use as multifunctional spaces with breathtaking panoramic views.

Under the roofs, a cascading ring of amenities allows for interconnected workspaces, and extends into the rooftop bar overlooking the Alps and Monte Rosa.

In parallel with the construction of the new residential lot on Via Spinola, the new project represents the completion of CityLife, which will become one of Europe’s major business districts, with a mix of public and private functions including residences, offices, shops and green areas.

 

Expected to open in 2023, the new neighborhood is considered one of the main “new urban centers” of Milan and a highly regarded example of urban renewal and regeneration in Italy.

Bjarke Ingels Andreas Klok Pedersen Florencia Kratsman Francesca Portesine Andy Coward Anna Pazurek Andy Young Beatrice Melli Bjarke Koch-Ørvad Camille Breuil Carl Pettersson Carmen Salas Ruiz Carmen Simone Chris Falla Claire Thomas Spiller Daniel Ferrara Bilesky Duncan Horswill Elisabetta Costa Filip Radu Giulio Rigoni Gualtiero Rulli Ioannis Gio Jason Chee Han Chia Jonathan Russell Kamila Abbiazova Lauren Connell Falla Lorenzo Boddi Marco Antonio Maycotte Nefeli Stamatari Marina Cogliani Marjan Mostavi Matilde Tavanti Michela Cardia Miles Treacy Ming Cheong Parinaz Kadkhodayi-Kholghi Pernille Kinch Andersen Pierre-Edouard Joseph Joiris de Caussin Ryohei Koike Sabina Blasiotti Sijia Zhong Timo Harboe Nielsen Ulla Hornsyld Vincent Katienin Konate Youngjin Jun Yueying Wan Zuzanna Hanna Sliwinska Siqi Emily Chen Giulia Frittoli Jakob Freek Engstrom Maria de Salvador Arnaiz Luca Vincenzo Puzzoni Liliana Prevedello Gianmarco Cannizzo Maayan Raviv

COLLABORATORS

Ramboll
GAD
Atelier Verticale
Systematica

Flugt - Refugee Museum of Denmark

OKSBØL, DENMARK

Denmark's Refugee Museum

OKSBØL, DENMARK

2022

CLIENT

Varde Museum

TYPOLOGY

Culture, Interiors

SIZE M2/FT2

2,075 / 22,335

STATUS

COMPLETED

Following the opening of Tirpitz Museum on the West Coast of Denmark – FLUGT – Denmark’s new Refugee Museum, is BIG’s second museum for Vardemuseerne: a local institution dedicated to the archaeology, dissemination, and collection of historical knowledge about the region.

 

Located at the site of Denmark’s largest Refugee camp from World War II, BIG has adapted and extended one of the camp’s few remaining structures – a hospital building – into a 1,600 m2 museum.

 

FLUGT gives a voice and a face to refugees worldwide and captures the universal challenges, emotions, spirit, and stories shared by displaced humans.

With approximately 35,000 World War II refugees staying at the Oksbøl refugee camp, the camp became the fifth-largest city of Denmark at the time. The camp’s hospital is one of the few remaining structures.

From outside, the abstract volume welcomes visitors into what appears to be a closed entry hall. Upon entering, a floor-to-ceiling curved glass wall reveals a view of a sheltered green courtyard and the forest, where the refugee camp used to be. The courtyard lets light flow into the entry hall that functions as a lobby or a temporary exhibition space for guests to experience before continuing their journey into one of the museum wings.

"From the very beginning of the design process, it was vital for us and our client, Vardemuseerne to preserve the two hospital buildings. The buildings are some of the last remaining physical manifestations of the former refugee camp, and not only is their preservation invaluable for future generations to understand the past and the present, the buildings also directly informed our design of the extension by means of their unique elongated form, structure and materiality. FLUGT is a great example of how adaptive reuse can result in sustainable, functional buildings that preserve our shared history while standing out architecturally."

Frederik Lyng — Associate & Project Leader, BIG

The courtyard creates a peaceful sensory experience both inside and outside the museum. A small mirror pool in the heart of the courtyard reflects the sky above it. Around the basin, heath planting known from the region emphasizes the identity of the area. 

The exhibition area in the north wing contains gallery spaces organized according to the original flow/circulation in the hospital. While most of the hospital room walls were torn down, some of the inside walls are kept intact and stabilized by three cross sections, creating larger exhibition spaces.

 

The south wing features a flexible conference room, smaller exhibition spaces, café. The back-of-house functions with the same character and materiality as in the north wing: white walls and intersections covered in white painted wood boards oriented according to the angle ceiling line, as well as yellow bricks across the entire museum floor, connecting past and present structures.

"The Refugee Museum of Denmark explores an important part of our history and a theme that is more relevant than ever, with millions of refugees currently displaced from their homes. We have designed an architectural framework that connects the past with the present - with a new building directly shaped by its relationship to the historic hospital buildings of the WWII refugee camp. We went into this project with all our heart to address one of the world’s greatest challenges - how we welcome and care for our fellow world citizens when they are forced to flee. The project is a continuation of our collaboration on Tirpitz Museum with Vardemuseerne and Claus Kjeld Jensen whose uncompromised design vision once again inspired our design for FLUGT."

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

In addition to preserving and reusing the hospital buildings for historical value, extending the lifespan of the existing structures supports BIG’s mission of reducing waste, conserving resources, and creating a smaller carbon footprint as it relates to materials manufacturing and transport.

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær David Zahle Ole Elkjær-Larsen Marius Tromholt-Richter Anders Holden Deleuran Andy Coward Barbora Hrmova Danyu Zeng Eddie Can Frederik Lyng Frederik Skou Jensen Hanne Halvorsen Jonathan Udemezue Katrine Sandstrøm Kim Lauer Kristian Mousten Laura Wätte Lone Fenger Albrechtsen Lukas Molter Mads Primdahl Rokkjær Michael James Kepke Nanna Gyldholm Møller Nikolaos Romanos Tsokas Oliver Siekierka Peter Mortensen Richard Howis Sascha Leth Rasmussen Sofiia Rokhmaniko Thor Larsen-Lechuga Tomas Karl Ramstrand Tore Banke Tristan Harvey Ulla Hornsyld Ákos Márk Horváth Anne Søby Nielsen Høgni Laksafoss Cheng-Huang Lin Gabrielė Ubarevičiūtė Giulia Frittoli Toni Mateu Muhammad Mansoor Awais Arthur Martinevski

COLLABORATORS

INGENIØR'NE
Tinker Imagineers
Gade & Mortensen Akustik
HB Trapper
BIG Landscape
BIG Ideas

VIA 57 West

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

VIA 57 West

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

2016

CLIENT

The Durst Organization

TYPOLOGY

Residential

SIZE M2/FT2

77,202 / 831,000

STATUS

COMPLETED

VIA 57 West introduces an entirely new typology to New York City: the Courtscraper. The 830,000 sq ft high-rise combines the density of the Manhattan skyscraper with the communal space of the European courtyard, offering 709 residential units with a lush 22,000 sq ft garden at the heart of the building. 

 

Located on the west side waterfront of Manhattan, framed by a power plant, a sanitation garage, and the West Side Highway – the site needed an oasis in the middle of all the infrastructure. BIG essentially proposed a courtyard building that is on the architectural scale – what Central Park is at the urban scale – an oasis in the heart of the city.

A hybrid between the European perimeter block and a traditional Manhattan high-rise, VIA combines the advantages of both: the compactness and efficiency of a courtyard building with the airiness and the expansive views of a skyscraper. By keeping three corners of the block low and lifting the north-east corner up towards its 450 ft peak, the courtyard opens views towards the Hudson River, bringing low western sun deep into the block and graciously preserving the adjacent Helena Tower’s views of the river. 

 

The grand stair leads to access and views to the central courtyard. The courtyard, which is inspired by the classic Copenhagen urban oasis, can also be seen from the street and serves to extend the adjacent greenery of the Hudson River Park into VIA.

The slope of the building allows for a transition in scale between the low-rise structures to the south and the high-rise residential towers to the north and west of the site. The highly visible sloping roof consists of a simple ruled surface perforated by terraces – each one unique and south-facing. The fishbone pattern of the walls is also reflected in its elevations.  

“In recent decades, some of the most interesting urban developments have come in the form of nature and public space, reinserting themselves back into the postindustrial pockets, appearing around the city; the pedestrianization of Broadway & Times Square; the bicycle lanes, the High Line and the industrial piers turning into parks. Located at the northern tip of the Hudson River Park, VIA continues this process of 'greenification,' allowing open space to invade the urban fabric of the Manhattan city grid. In an unlikely fusion of what seems to be two mutually exclusive typologies, the courtyard and the skyscraper, the Courtscraper is the recent addition to the Manhattan skyline, showing that we don’t have to limit our choices to one or the other - we get to have both.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

Every apartment gets a bay window to amplify the benefits of the generous view and balconies. At the upper levels, the apartments are organized in a fishbone layout orienting the homes towards the view of the water. Large terraces are carved into the warped façade to maximize views and light into apartments, while ensuring privacy to the residents. 

 

The material concept for the interior design of the project is “Scandimerican,” another layer of the European-American hybridity: classic modern Scandinavian material sensibility blended with local New York materials. The primary materials of the apartments are oak wood floors and cabinets, with white porcelain tiles in the bathrooms.

The 22,000 sq ft courtyard is complimented by other building amenities – a VIA gym and fitness lounge, a 25-yard swimming pool, a mini golf venue, basketball courts and a variety of resident lounges.

The form of the building shifts depending on the viewer’s vantage point. While appearing like a pyramid from the West Side Highway, it turns into a dramatic glass spire from West 58th Street.  

Bjarke Ingels Thomas Christoffersen Daniel Sundlin Beat Schenk Alvaro Velosa Pauline Lavie-Luong Sören Grünert Francesca Portesine Ivy Hume Aaron Hales Alessandro Ronfini Alvaro Garcia Mendive Benjamin Schulte Birk Daugaard Brian Foster Christoffer Gotfredsen David Brown Gabrielle Nadeau Hongyi Jin Jenny Chang Lauren Turner Lucian Mihail Racovitan Marcella Martinez Maya Shopova Mina Rafiee Ola El Hariri Rakel Karlsdottir Tara Hagan Thomas Fagan Tiago Barros Valentina Mele Valerie Lechene Yi Li Gül Ertekin Aleksander Tokarz Alessio Valmori Celine Jeanne Eivor Davidsen Felicia Guldberg Florian Oberschneider Ho Kyung Lee Julian Liang Julianne Gola Laura Youf Maria Nikolova Mitesh Dixit Nicklas Antoni Rasch Riccardo Mariano Stanley Lung Steffan Heath Thilani Rajarathna Tyler Alexander Polich Xu Li Dominyka Mineikyte

AWARDS

ULI NY Award of Excellence for Multi Family, 2021


ASLA NY Merit Award, Residential Landscape Architecture Design, 2018

London Design Awards, Gold Winner, 2017

AIA Housing Award for Multifamily Housing, 2017

AIA New York State Design Award for Residential for Multi Family, 2017

ArchDaily, Housing Building of the Year, 2017

ACEC New York Engineering Excellence Diamond Award, 2017

Brick in Architecture Award for Paving & Landscape, 2017

The Emporis Skyscraper Award, 2016

The International Highrise Award, 2016

CTBUH Best Tall Building Americas, 2016

Residential Architect Design Award for Multifamily Housing category, 2016

Interior Design Best of Year Award for Residence: Lobby & Amenity Spaces, 2016

American Architecture Prize Residential Architecture Silver Award, 2016

ENR New York Best Residential Project, 2016

World Architecture Festival Best Housing Category Finalist, 2016

Concrete Industry Board Award for Quality Concrete Special Recognition, 2015

P/A Progressive Architecture Awards, Citation, 2015

AIANY Design Award, Merit Award for Future Project, 2012

COLLABORATORS

SLCE Architects
Starr Whitehouse Landscape
Thornton Tomasetti
Dagher Engineering
Langan Engineering
Hunter Roberts
Enclos
Philip Habib & Assoc
Nancy Packes
Van Deusen & Assoc
Cerami & Assoc
CPP
AKRF
Vidaris Inc.
Brandston Partnership Inc.

VLTAVA Philharmonic Prague

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

VLTAVA Philharmonic Prague

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

CLIENT

Prague Institute of Planning and Development

TYPOLOGY

Culture

SIZE M2/FT2

49,715 / 535,120

STATUS

IN DESIGN

In May of 2022, the City of Prague unveiled BIG’s design for the country’s first national concert hall in over 100 years: The Vltava Philharmonic Hall. The new concert hall will become the home of the world-class philharmonic for 1800+ audiences, celebrate the Czech music tradition and cement the country as acultural capital in Europe.

 

The Vltava Philharmonic Hall is composed as a cascade of outdoor destinations from the waterfront on the river to the city’s iconic skyline. By raising and lowering the corners of the building at multiple touch points, the public spaces connect and allow activities to spill in and out of the building on every side: towards the river, the square, the street, and the alley. Visitors will be drawn in from all forms of arrival, with carefully chosen programs inviting them to explore the music venues inside or climb the elegant, arced roofs of the new concert hall.  

The new Philharmonic is conceived as a contemporary extension of Prague’s dramatic urban topography, as a cascade of outdoor destinations. A series of grand public plazas will become a new symbol of inclusionary architecture, welcoming a multitude of Prague’s vibrant urban life to flow across, around, through, under and over the new concert hall.

 

The site is bound by four key traffic corridors, the character of which informs the public space programming around the Philharmonic. Along the Western side, Bubenská passes the site and continues across the Vltava on the Hlávkův Bridge. Here, several modes of mobility are accommodated within the public realm. Along the North, the tram line runs adjacent to the new neighborhood development. As a car-free zone, this corridor becomes an important pedestrian and soft mobility connection to the surrounding neighborhoods. The new ecological corridor extending down from Stromovka Royal Game Reserve passes by the Eastern side of the site, creating a lush green buffer between the Philharmonic and the train line.

 

Most importantly, the Vltava River runs along the Southern side of the site, connected to the streetscape by a new waterfront promenade.

An essential public building for the Holešovice district and a new focal point for Prague, the new Philharmonic extends horizontally and vertically in all directions to create key urban connections and form a recognizable landmark for surrounding communities near and far.

 

The roofs are conceived as a continuation of the grand public plaza at the foot of the building. The undulating stepped form of the roofs allows visitors to meander to the summit of the building, as if climbing a hill. Slender vertical colonnades support the building’s roof terraces while undersides of warm timber from the Bohemian Forest provide shade and shelter. A space to sit and to gather, spaces for informal outdoor performances and views inward to the Philharmonic’s lively musical environment.

Arriving in the grand foyer, guests are greeted by a striking interior inspired by Czech Glass Artists which lead them into the music venues for a truly contemporary music experience. Arranged like petals of a pinecone turned inside out, the seats of Prague Hall are rotating within the compactness of a perfect square. The seating rakes meet at their corners to allow physical connectivity between every seat in the audience, providing a greater sense of unity and shared experience. Warm timber interiors provide balanced acoustics with a natural material, and form an environment designed to strengthen the intimate connection between the audience and orchestra.

"The Vltava Philharmonic Hall is composed as a meandering journey from riverbank to rooftop. Public flows and belvedere plazas unite the city life of Prague to the music within. Its halls are formed for sight, fine-tuned for sound, and orchestrated for functionality and connectivity. From this rhythmic structure, a symphony of colonnades and balconies extend as platforms for public life. Expressive yet pragmatic, the new Philharmonic will ascend to form a key landmark for Prague - from river to roof."

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

“The new Vltava Philharmonic Hall will be a symbol of openness, accessibility, and exploration. From the Vltava square, streets ascend upward connecting interior balconies with exterior colonnades and terraces. Like eighth, quarter, half and whole notes, the steps the benches, façade, and colonnade are perfectly on beat offering its resident orchestras effective and extroverted rehearsal areas, while bringing the audiences within the halls closer to the source in an environment that is both majestic and intimate.”

Brian Yang — Partner in Charge, BIG

Beyond being a major cultural destination for Prague, the building is crafted to maximize its potential to host external uses and special events. The venues are carefully designed to maximize flexibility for a range of uses – from the boldness of contemporary music styles to theater performances and digital exhibitions.

 

At the buildings summit, an elegant hyperbolic structure spans over the Vltava Hall and forms the iconic ceiling of a restaurant and event ballroom with views of the historic city center of Prague.

Bjarke Ingels Brian Yang Shane Dalke Alberto Menegazzo Christian Vang Madsen Izabella Banas Jan Magasanik Louise Mould Luca Nicoletti Mads Primdahl Rokkjær Matteo Baggiarini Matthew Oravec Paula Madrid Polina Galantseva Sarkis Sarkisyan Sorcha Burke Giulia Frittoli Giulia Vanni Tania-Cristina Farcas Karim Daw Giulia Orlando Eleanor Gibson Casper Klarén Ondrej Slunecko Yanis Amasri Sierra Alicia De Nobrega Khaled Magdy Zaki Ahmed Elfeky Clara Elma Margareta Karlsson Heinrich Froese Neto Jeremias Sas Iros Jonathan Chester Fernanda Furuya Paola Yepes Bocanegra Rohit Nandakumar Jialin Liang Jonathan Christian Chin Anastasia Papaspyrou Nikol Maraj Jakub Misař Jan Goebel Eliška Slaměna Iveta Jakubčíková Camila Alzate Riano Peter Høgenhaven

COLLABORATORS

Theatre Projects & Nagata Acoustic
Buro Happold
AED
ETC
Systematica
Front
Mozses

NOMA 2.0

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

Noma 2.0

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

2018

CLIENT

noma

TYPOLOGY

Hospitality

SIZE M2/FT2

1,290 / 13,886

STATUS

COMPLETED

In 2015, restaurant Noma – known as the “World’s Best Restaurant”- closed its doors to the 16th century warehouse that had been its home for fourteen years. After more than three years of planning and collaboration, Noma reopened in 2018 on the outskirts of autonomous district Christiania – this time at the protected site of an old fortification once used to store mines for the Royal Danish Navy.

 

BIG’s design for Noma 2.0 dissolves the traditional idea of a restaurant into its constituent parts and reassembles them to put the chefs at the heart of the restaurant.

Noma’s new home, a historic fortification from 1917, was once used to store mines for the Royal Danish Navy. Abandoned for several years and covered in graffiti, Noma acquired the linear warehouse named Søminedepotet and had to take into account the strict guidelines for preserving the historically significant site.

“When we found the location for the new Noma, we knew we had to come up with an architectural solution which made sense for our guests, the team and the surroundings. I believe that Bjarke and the BIG team came up with the ideal non-pretentious solution that we enjoy calling our home for years to come. To say that we are thrilled with the end result would be an understatement.”

Peter Kreiner — CEO, Noma

Guests have the opportunity to walk through each of the surrounding buildings and to experience a variety of Nordic materials and building techniques: the barbeque is a giant walk-in steel chimney, and the lounge looks and feels like a room-sized cozy fireplace made entirely of brick – inside and out.

 

A collection of 11 separate yet connected buildings are tailored to their specific needs and are densely clustered around restaurant’s heart: the kitchen. Designed like a panopticon, the kitchen allows the chefs to oversee the staff and guest areas, while every guest can follow what would traditionally happen behind-the-scenes.

 

The raw shell of the historic warehouse is preserved and used for back-of-house functions, including the prep kitchen, fermentation labs, fish tanks, terrarium, ant farm, and break-out areas for staff.

Each building within the building is connected by glass covered paths that reveal the changes in weather, daylight, and seasons – making the natural environment integral to the culinary experience.

The greenhouses serve as food production, arrival lounge and experimental kitchen. A permaculture garden designed and planted by Piet Oudolf serves as a garden for the senses, transforming the former military facility into an urban farm for the production, preparation and consumption of new Nordic cuisine.

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær David Zahle Jakob Lange Ole Elkjær-Larsen Allen Shakir Athena Morella Borko Nikolic Claus Rytter Bruun de Neergaard Dag Præstegaard Duncan Horswill Enea Michelesio Eskild Schack Pedersen Frederik Lyng Geoffrey Eberle Hessam Dadkhah Hugo Yun Tong Soo Jinseok Jang Jonas Aarsø Larsen Joos Jerne Kim Christensen Kristoffer Negendahl Lasse Lyhne-Hansen Manon Otto Margarita Nutfulina Michael James Kepke Morten Roar Berg Nanna Gyldholm Møller Ningnan Ye Olga Litwa Ryohei Koike Simona Reiciunaite Stefan Plugaru Tomas Karl Ramstrand Tiago Sá Timo Harboe Nielsen Tobias Hjortdal Tore Banke Yehezkiel Wiliardy Manik Yunyoung Choi Gökce Günbulut Aleksander Wadas Andreas Müllertz Angelos Siampakoulis Carlos Soria Giedrius Mamavicius Kyle Thomas David Tousant Nina Vuga Ren Yang Tan Vilius Linge Yan Ma Yoko Gotoh

AWARDS

Berlingske Byens Bedste Award for Construction, Winner, 2019


AIA Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture, Winner, 2019

INSIDE World Festival of Interiors, Restaurant Category Winner, 2019

Wallpaper* Design Award for Best New Restaurant, Winner, 2019

Danish Carpentry Award, 2018

Den Danske Lyspris, Winner, 2018

Interior Design Magazine Best of Year Award for Hospitality: Fine Dining, Finalist, 2018

Snedker Craftsmenship Prize, 2018

Architizer A+ Award for Hospitality: Restaurant, Jury + Popular Choice Winner, 2018

COLLABORATORS

NT Consult
Studio David Thulstrup
Thing&Brandt Landskab
BIG Ideas

ESET Campus

BRATISLAVA, SLOVAKIA

ESET Campus

BRATISLAVA, SLOVAKIA

CLIENT

ESET

TYPOLOGY

Work

SIZE M2/FT2

55,000 / 592,015

STATUS

IN DESIGN

The 55,000 m2 ESET Campus will create an entirely electricity powered cybersecurity, AI and innovation ecosystem in the heart of Europe. Located in Patronka, Bratislava, the new tech village replaces a former military hospital between the Carpathian Mountains and the city center of Bratislava. 

 

Spanning a forested nature site, the campus consists of 12 individual buildings of varying sizes and uses organized around a central courtyard. The buildings on the outer perimeter will be designated public spaces, while four of the buildings situated on the inside of the site will be home to ESET’s 1,500 employees – with the potential to scale up to 2,400 employees.

 

Rather than a single hermetic entity, BIG has  dissolved the ESET Campus into an urban village of interconnected buildings, framing public paths and urban squares. The diverse cluster of individual pavilions is unified by the undulating solar roofs – forming a single silhouette rising from the forested park like a man-made addition to the Little Carpathians mountain range. The ESET Campus is expected to open in 2027.

BIG’s design for the new neighborhood replicates the spatial hierarchy of nature – the low and broad perimeter of the shared public spaces is easily accessible to all, allowing public life to flourish within the network of streets. The higher peak of the architectural ‘mountain’ houses the ESET business, providing the company’s teams with innovative facilities while maintaining privacy.  

The main courtyard, located at the center of the four ESET HQ buildingsacts as a focal point for the local community. Public spaces serving retail, educational, sports, and cultural purposes are scattered around this courtyard, animating the ground floor and activating the network of streets

 

The overall massing of the campus has multiple frontages; the open corners of the four ESET HQ blocks, in combination with views into each building from the surrounding streets, create inviting moments that further connect the exterior with the interior. 

Upon entering the main ESET HQ lobby –located in the largest building of the campus –ESET employees are greeted by a cascading staircase that connects the ground floor with the upper levels. While each of ESET HQ’s four buildings have a central atrium – lit with skylights in areas of the floorplates that would otherwise be dark – the stairs in the main ESET HQ lobby atrium are surrounded with social spaces and biophilia, enhancing the connection of the active ground level to the upper office levels.  

 

The campus will be powered by all-electric energy, relying on renewable sources including PV roofing that will contribute to the campus’ carbon negative goal. ESET’s exterior will utilize timber and glass to help create high-performance façade system; balconies will provide additional outdoor spaces and shading while providing natural ventilation to maximize the campus’ energy efficiency. 

On the north-west side, the campus opens up to the park, providing protection from both the busy main street and the railway, and connecting the wilderness of the Carpathian mountains with the city. Embedded into the existing natural landscape, the park is filled with public areas for recreation, interaction, and relaxation while boosting local biodiversity and creating pockets suitable for outdoor working. 

“The ESET campus will set a new benchmark for sustainability. The design goal is an entirely electric building, with the vast solar roof and ground source heat pumps creating a significant amount of renewable energy. The use of timber throughout the project ensures lowest possible carbon footprint.”

Andreas Klok Pedersen — Partner, BIG

Bjarke Ingels Andreas Klok Pedersen Florencia Kratsman Sasha Lukianova Anna Pazurek Andy Young Boni Yuen Carmen Simone Gualtiero Rulli Ioannis Gio Jason Chee Han Chia Lorenzo Boddi Ludmila Majernikova Matilde Tavanti Michela Cardia Rihards Dzelme Stefan Plugaru Vincent Katienin Konate Youngjin Jun Maria de Salvador Arnaiz Richard Sean Mc Intyre Maayan Raviv Solveig Lola Audrey Jappy

COLLABORATORS

Inflow
Pantograph
BuroHappold
Arup

Danish Maritime Museum

HELSINGØR, DENMARK

Danish Maritime Museum

HELSINGØR, DENMARK

2013

CLIENT

Helsingør Municipality | Helsingør Maritime Museum

TYPOLOGY

Culture, Interiors

SIZE M2/FT2

7,600 / 81,806

STATUS

COMPLETED

The Danish Maritime Museum is located in a unique historic and spatial context: between one of Denmark’s most important and famous buildings, the Kronborg Castle, and a new, ambitious cultural center – the Culture Yard.

 

BIG was invited for a competition to design a Maritime museum inside the neighboring decommissioned dry-dock, where ships used to be built. Instead, BIG proposed to place the museum underground, just outside the wall of the dock in order to preserve the dock as an open, outdoor display, maintaining the powerful structure as the center of the Maritime Museum. By placing the museum this way, it appears as a discreet part of the cultural environment associated with the Kronborg Castle and the neighboring Culture Yard, while at the same time manifesting itself as an independent institution.

 

Situated right next to Hamlet’s Kronborg Castle which became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000, the new museum had to stay invisible as to not distract from the castle. At the same time, the museum’s leadership wanted a recognizable institution to attract as many museum visitors as possible.

"When one designs next to one of Denmark’s most important architectural icons, the UNESCO World Heritage Kronborg Castle, it requires an equal dose of respect and sensitivity. At the same time, it is every Museum Director’s dream to have their institution be recognized as its own architectural icon. Our challenge was to do both at the same time."

David Zahle — Partner, BIG

The bridges span the dry dock providing visitors with short-cuts to the various portions of the museum. One bridge serves to navigate visitors to the entrance while another contains an auditorium, creating access from Kronborg Castle to the harbor. The bridges create a dynamic tension between old and new.

The arrival to the museum is through a descending set of ramps which enter both the dry dock and the world of the seafarer. Like a siren’s song, the museum attracts the passer-by deeper and deeper into the long and noble Danish Maritime history in its galleries, finally standing in the dry dock with a view of the skies.

 

With hard-sound reflecting surfaces and an open ‘ceiling,’ the dry dock’s acoustics are perfect for dance performances and concerts, but also suitable for other outdoor activities, exhibitions, and events – turning the Maritime Museum into a center for cultural life in Helsingor. Through minimal means, BIG’s design created maximum functionality and architectural resonance.

The architecture of the museum is a collision between the old and the new: heavy textured concrete and light transparent steel and glass.

The anchor chain serves the double purpose of exhibit and structure – not just a theatrical element, but a hard working part of the building.

 

The galleries underneath are tilted glass pavilions open to the surrounding dock. To slim the structure down, the span is cut in half by hanging the floor from the ceiling.

The dock creates a museum space as a cohesive floor plan which discreetly becomes lower and lower across the entire museum length. Simple accessibility ramps and bridges are added, cutting through the dock in a structural and sculptural way.

The museum is a new form of public space as an urban void in Helsingor Docklands – an unexpected venue for the cultural life of Helsingor.

 

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær David Zahle Annette Jensen Armen Menendian Jan Magasanik Lone Fenger Albrechtsen Stefan Plugaru Zoltan Kalászi Gül Ertekin Alina Tamosiunaite Alysen Hiller Ana Merino Andreas Geisler Johansen Ariel Joy Norback Wallner Baptiste Blot Christian Alvarez Christin Svensson Claudia Hertrich Claudio Moretti Cory Mattheis Dennis Rasmussen Eskild Nordbud Felicia Guldberg Gaetan Brunet Henrik Kania James Duggan Schrader Jan Borgstrøm Jeppe Ecklon Johan Cool Jonas Mønster Karsten Hammer Hansen Kirstine Ragnhild Lucas Torres Aguero Malte Kloe Michael Andersen Oana Simionescu Rasmus Pedersen Riccardo Mariano Rune Hansen Sebastian Latz Tammy Teng Tina Tröster Todd Bennett Xi Chen Xing Xiong Xu Li Rasmus Rodam Marc Jay Tina Lund Højgaard Jensen Michal Kristof Andy Yu Qianyi Lim Maria Mavriku Masatoshi Oka Pablo Labra Peter Rieff Sara Sosio John Pries Jensen Kristina Loskotova

AWARDS

Dansk Stalpris (Danish Steel Award), 2016


Mies van der Rohe Award Finalist, 2015

RUM Magazine Award for Best Architecture of the Year, 2015

AIA Institute National Honor Award for Architecture, 2015

RIBA Awards European National Winner, 2014

World Architecture Festival Best Cultural Category Winner, 2014

European Prize of Architecture Philippe Rotthier, 2014

Danmarks Rederiforenings SØFARTSPRIS, 2014

Architizer A+ Awards Jury Winner, 2014

AIANY Design Awards Honor for Architecture, 2014

ArchDaily Cultural Building of the Year, 2014

DETAIL Prize, 2014

AL Light & Architecture Design Awards Commendable Achievement, 2014

COLLABORATORS

Alectia
Rambøll
Freddy Madsen Ingeniører
Kossmann Dejong
KiBiSi

Lego Brand House

BILLUND, DENMARK

LEGO Brand House

BILLUND, DENMARK

2017

CLIENT

Kirkbi A/S | LEGO Foundation | LEGO Group

TYPOLOGY

Culture, Interiors

SIZE M2/FT2

11,960 / 128,737

STATUS

COMPLETED

The LEGO brand House in Billund, Denmark is as playful and inviting as the world’s famous LEGO toy itself. Applying the ratio of the famous LEGO brick throughout the architecture, LEGO Brand House embodies the culture and values at the heart of all LEGO experiences. Simultaneously, the colorful building cements Billund’s status as the home of the LEGO brick and the children’s capital of the world.

 

Due to its central location in the heart of Billund, sitting at the site of the city’s former town hall, LEGO House is conceived as an urban space as much as an experience center. Consisting of 21 overlapping architectural blocks, a 2,000 m2 public square allows visitors and citizens of Billund to spend time inside or simply shortcut through the building.

The LEGO square is energized by an urban character, welcoming locals and visitors to the café, restaurant, LEGO store, and conference facilities. The plaza appears like an urban cave without any visible columns and is illuminated through the cracks and gaps between the volumes above.

 

Above the square, a cluster of galleries overlap to create a continuous sequence of exhibitions. Each gallery is color-coded in LEGO’s primary colors so wayfinding through the exhibitions becomes a journey through the color spectrum.

"LEGO house is a literal manifestation of the infinite possibilities of the LEGO brick. Through systematic creativity, children of all ages are empowered with the tools to create their own worlds and to inhabit them through play. At its finest, that is what architecture - and LEGO play - is all about: enabling people to imagine new worlds that are more exciting and expressive than the status quo, and to provide them with the skills to make them reality. This is what children do every day with LEGO bricks - and this is what we have done at LEGO House with actual bricks, taking Billund a step closer towards becoming the Capital for Children."

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

The first and second floors include four play zones arranged by color and programmed with activities that represent a certain aspect of a child’s learning: red is creative, blue is cognitive, green is social, and yellow is emotional. Guests of all ages can have an immersive and interactive experience, express their imagination, and not least be challenged by meeting other builders from all over the world.

The top of the building is crowned by the Masterpiece Gallery, a collection of LEGO fans’ beloved creations that pay tribute to the LEGO community. The Masterpiece Gallery is made of the iconic 2×4 LEGO brick and showcases art beneath eight circular skylights that resemble the studs of the brick. Like the golden ratio, the proportions of the brick are nested in the geometries of everything man-made in the building, from the glazed ceramic tiles in the steps and walls to the overall 21 block scheme. Atop the Masterpiece Gallery, citizens and visitors can get a 360° panoramic view of the city. Some of the rooftops can be accessed via pixelated public staircases that double as informal auditoria for people watching or seating for performances.

The History Collection at the lower level is where visitors can experience an archival immersion into the LEGO company and brand’s story. The Vault – located underneath LEGO Square – is where children and AFoLs (Adult Fans of LEGO) can witness the first edition of almost every LEGO set ever manufactured, including the new 774-piece, 197-step kit replicating the stacked-block formation of the LEGO House.

"All activities in the house are related to our LEGO philosophy that learning through play promotes innovation and creativity. Play runs through the LEGO Group’s DNA, and it is really brought to life in LEGO House. Everything from experience zones and outdoor areas to our restaurant concepts is based on play and creativity, so no matter what you do in LEGO House, it will have something to do with playing."

Jesper Vilstrup — CEO, Lego

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær David Zahle Jakob Lange Brian Yang Andreas Klok Pedersen Jakob Sand Ole Elkjær-Larsen Jesper Boye Andersen Annette Jensen Ask Hvas Birgitte Villadsen Chris Falla Christoffer Gotfredsen Jakob Andreassen Jakub Wlodarczyk Jesper Bo Jensen Kamilla Heskje Kasper Reimer Hansen Kekoa Charlot Lone Fenger Albrechtsen Lorenzo Boddi Mads Engaard Stidsen Manon Otto Michael James Kepke Ryohei Koike Sergiu Calacean Snorre Nash Stefan Plugaru Tobias Hjortdal Tommy Bjørnstrup Høgni Laksafoss Agne Tamasauskaite Ariel Joy Norback Wallner Daruisz Duong Vu Hong Esben Christoffersen Franck Fdida Ioana Fartadi Scurtu Katarzyna Krystyna Siedlecka Katerina Joannides Leszek Czaja Magnus Algreen Suhr Marta Christensen Mathias Bank Stigsen Ole Dau Mortensen Stefan Wolf Thomas Jakobsen Randbøll Thomas Richard Hart Julia Boromissza Katarzyna Stachura Søren Askehave Jakob Ohm Laursen ‍Louise Bøgeskov Hou

AWARDS

EU Mies van der Rohe Award, Shortlist, 2019


Civic Trust Awards, Winner, 2019

IDEAT Future Awards Shortlist, Best Architecture in Commercial Design, 2018

INSIDE World Festival of Interiors, Civic, Culture & Transport Category Finalist, 2018

Danish Design Award Winner, Feel Good Category, 2018

Architizer A+ Award, Jury and Popular Choice Winner for Architecture + Branding, 2018

COLLABORATORS

COWI
Dr. Lüchinger + Meyer Brauingenieure AG
Jesper Kongshaug
Gade & Mortensen Akustik
E-Types

Telus Sky

CALGARY, CANADA

Telus Sky

CALGARY, CANADA

2021

CLIENT

Westbank Project Corporation | Telus | Allied Development Corporation

TYPOLOGY

Work, Residential

SIZE M2/FT2

70,606 / 760,000

STATUS

COMPLETED

The Telus Sky tower creates a lively mixture of living and working in the heart of Calgary city center which has developed as a typical North American city center with a cluster of corporate towers surrounded by a periphery of low-density suburban homes.

 

The car is an essential part of everyday life moving in and out of the city, and the programmatic uniformity of the downtown leaves it empty at night as people return home. Situated at the intersection of light rail and arterial roads, the 60-story mixed-use tower stacks the homes on an office tower, creating a programmatically diverse building with activity throughout the day.

 

"How do you make two different buildings with different programs and different floorplates appear like a single silhouette on the skyline? And more importantly: how do you make a 700-foot-tall building elegant?"

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

By remaining faithful to the orthogonality of the ground floor, the diagonal shift creates a pixelation of the façade, forming terraces and balconies for the residences.

 

The smooth transition from the ideal floor plate of the office, to the optimal floor plate of the residences, generates an elegantly curving silhouette.

A network of skybridges enters where the building meets the neighboring building, an existing switching station. A vertical canyon expands the semipublic network upwards. The tiles on the wall of the adjacent façade seem to melt and peel open as pockets for plants.

Above the main entrance, the pixels of the façade extend beyond the site limits, creating a series of canopies, terraces and lounges interwoven across the corner.

 

At night, a 160,000 sq ft art installation ‘Northern Lights’ by Douglas Coupland lights up the north and south façades of the tower making it the largest public art piece in Calgary.

“Northern Lights draws in the public, in a similar way to a firework show. It has an amazing sense of real-time motion and energy, along with the build-up to a spectacular crescendo. BIG's TELUS Sky design is simultaneously symmetrical and curvilinear. Its twisting and mineralogical façade provided the perfect canvas to channel such a dynamic symbol of nature as the Northern Lights. For me, it was a chance to create something very analog on a system that is very digital. Like the building itself, there is an inherent contradiction, in that technology can be both a form of art as well as a tool for its creation.”

Douglas Coupland — Artist

Bjarke Ingels Thomas Christoffersen Beat Schenk Jakob Lange Agne Rapkeviciute Carl Macdonald Florencia Kratsman Jan Leenknegt Julie Kaufman Megan Van Artsdalen Alex Wu Bryan Hardin Deb Campbell Francesca Portesine Haoyue Wang Ivy Hume Annette Miller Barbora Srpkova Benjamin Johnson Benzion Rodman Brian Rome Carolien Schippers Choonghyo Lee Christoffer Gotfredsen Christopher White Cristian Lera Silva Daisy Zhong Davide Maggio David Spittler Dennis Harvey Douglass Alligood Elena Bresciani Gaurav Janey Iannis Kandyliaris Iris Van der Heide Isshin Morimoto Jennifer Phan John Kim Justyna Mydlak Ku Hun Chung Lina Bondarenko Manon Gicquel Mateusz Rek Maya Shopova Michael Evola Michael Zhang Nicholas Coffee Quentin Stanton Stephanie Choi Tara Hagan Terrence Lallak Tianqi Zhang Yaziel Juarbe Yoanna Shivarova Benjamin Caldwell Ho Kyung Lee Jack Lipson Peter Lee Yifu Sun Thea Wiradinata

AWARDS

Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, Best Tall Building 200m-299m, 2021 Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, Award of Excellence Winner, 2020


COLLABORATORS

DIALOG
Integral Group
Glotman Simpson Consulting Engineers
LMDG Building Code Consultants
Gunn Consultants Inc.
Bunt & Associates Consulting Engineers
Luxigon
Buda Facade Engineering Ltd.
Morrison Hershfield
RSI Studio
BIG Ideas

National Juneteenth Museum

FORT WORTH, UNITED STATES

National Juneteenth Museum

FORT WORTH, UNITED STATES

CLIENT

Juneteenth Museum

TYPOLOGY

Culture

SIZE M2/FT2

8,361 / 90,000

STATUS

IDEA

With ‘The Grandmother of Juneteenth,’ Ms. Opal Lee, at the helm, the National Juneteenth Museum is dedicated to preserving the history of Juneteenth and legacy of freedom. Declared a federal holiday in the U.S. on June 17, 2021, when President Joe Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act with Ms. Lee by his side, Juneteenth (June 19th) commemorates the Emancipation Proclamation’s enforcement and the liberation of the remainder of the enslaved both in Texas and throughout the newly reformed United States, which happened on June 19, 1865.

 

Located in the Historic Southside of Fort Worth, Texas which was divided by the I-35W highway in the 1960s and is one of the South’s most underserved communities – The National Juneteenth Museum will be the epicenter for the education, preservation and celebration of Juneteenth nationally and globally, hosting exhibitions, discussions, and events about the significance of African American freedom. The new 50,000 square foot building, expected to break ground in 2023 is designed by BIG alongside the architect-of-record, African American-owned design and build firm, KAI Enterprises.

“Seeing the national museum moving forward is a dream fulfilled. I’ve had a little Juneteenth Museum in that very spot for almost 20 years, and to see it become a central place for discussion, collaboration and learning seems to be the providential next step – from my walking campaign to Washington, D.C., the petition, and having Juneteenth declared a federal holiday. It’s mind-boggling, but I’m glad to see it all come to pass.”

Ms. Opal Lee — Founding Board Member, National Juneteenth Museum

The National Juneteenth Museum, designed in close collaboration with the local Fort Worth community, seeks to provide a cultural and economic anchor for this neighborhood and act as a catalyst for ensuring its future vitality, including immersive galleries, a business incubator, food hall for local vendors, Black Box flex space, and a theater.

 

The museum’s undulating roof creates a series of ridges, peaks, and valleys of varying heights that combine to create a ‘nova star’ shaped courtyard in the middle of the museum. Meaning ‘new star,’ the nova star represents a new chapter for the African Americans looking ahead towards a more just future. The publicly accessible courtyard will be the anchor for the museum and its activities. At the center of the courtyard, the ‘five point’ star is engraved into the terrazzo pavement. In addition to representing Texas, the last state to adopt and acknowledge the freedom of African American slaves – the star nods to the American flag’s 50 stars that represent all 50 U.S states, representing the freedom of African Americans across the country. 

While five street-level entrances allow the galleries and exhibitions to be accessed as individual spaces, two publicly-accessible covered ‘portals’ connect directly to the courtyard and main gallery entrances, welcoming visitors from both the north and the southwest of the site via generous entryways defined by warm, vibrant colors. The mass timber structure that defines the design’s materiality continues into the interior, visually connecting the two realms.  

 

In addition to this visual continuity of the materiality, the building’s public and private realms are also interconnected through the museum’s circular layout; on the ground floor, the two portals that connect to the courtyard are flanked by each of the programs: one portion of the galleries, the business incubator, food hall for local vendors, Black Box flex space, and theatre. To access the museum galleries, which begin on the ground floor, guests enter the generous reception area, and are guided to the light-filled mezzanine level via staircase or wheelchair-accessible elevator.  

 

“The National Juneteenth Museum came to BIG looking for a design that captures the social, cultural, and spiritual importance of Juneteenth celebrations for black people while expressing its historic significance and relevance to all Americans. Our hope is that this building will become a gateway to the Historic Southside community of Fort Worth while serving as a national and global destination. Our engagement with Ms. Opal Lee and members of the community, to really understand their needs, is what informed a lot of the design principles. As a black architect, this project is one of the most rewarding experiences of my career.”

Douglass Alligood — Partner, BIG

The mezzanine level reveals the rest of the gallery spaces, which are connected by a ring of circulation that wraps the courtyard. Glass is utilized as the interior wall of both the ground and mezzanine floors to create a sense of openness and transparency while complementing the pared-back timber and concrete materials. Similarly, the ‘nova star’ cut out of the roof at the center of the building of which the mezzanine wraps around allows light to travel through the entire space. Wrapping around the nova star shape above, the mezzanine galleries physically connect each of the programs while being literally elevated – providing visitors an above perspective of the public courtyard below, and those in the courtyard with views of the galleries above.  

 

Outside the museum building, a network of plazas provides wayfinding opportunities, extending the sense of community of the interior to the outdoor spaces. Polished concrete and terrazzo flooring continue out to the exterior spaces, creating visual continuity between the public and private realms. Generous lawns, native landscaping, and wood seating are dispersed throughout the plaza areas, providing places for outdoor exhibitions, large-scale installations and gatherings.  

Bjarke Ingels Daniel Sundlin Alejandra Cortes Alvaro Velosa Florencia Kratsman Linus Saavedra Marcus Wilford Terrence Chew Andrea Hektor Douglass Alligood Mama Qicheng Wu Montre'ale Jones Ololade Owolabi Pooja Annamaneni Abdur-Rahman Harunah

Biosphere

HARADS, SWEDEN

Biosphere

HARADS, SWEDEN

CLIENT

Treehotel

TYPOLOGY

Hospitality

SIZE M2/FT2

34 / 366

STATUS

COMPLETED

The Treehotel in Swedish Lapland is known for its broad variety of cabins, with each one having a distinct identity that responds and interacts differently with the surrounding forest. BIG’s aim was to amplify Treehotel’s focus on sustainability and natural tourism, and create a resilient design in a region with strong seasonal climatic contrasts.

 

Designed in collaboration with Treehotel and Swedish ornithologist Ulf Öhman, the Biosphere cabin brings 350 bird houses to the Harads village, with the mission to decrease the downward spiral of the bird population in the region. 

"Inventories in Norrbotten County, carried out both by us as ornithologists and by the County Administrative Board, show that a number of different bird populations are decreasing. Forestry has led to a reduced number of natural holes in trees where breeding birds nest. The installation of bird nests is therefore an important measure to take. Furthermore, climate change leads to the insect boom happening earlier in the year, and by the time the birds’ eggs hatch, the boom has already passed. Feeding is an important support mechanism for the birds that stay in Northern Sweden and require food during winter. Demonstrating the use of bird nests and feeding, not just at the Treehotel but for people to install near their own homes, is valuable."

Ulf Öhman — Chairman, Norrbotten Ornithological Association

Biosphere is accessed via a suspended bridge that slopes from the ground to the top of the trees. The interior of the 34 m2 hotel room incorporates rich dark interiors and organic materials inspired by the surrounding landscape. The checker solid-open conceptual make-up allows for a range of experiences within a relatively small space. Visitors have access to a roof terrace – close to the treetop canopies – that offer a 360-degree views of the forest.

By varying the individual sizes of the bird houses and expanding them outwards based upon the bird type and frequency in the area, light can enter the space whilst maintaining the outwards views.

 

Through wrapping the new hotel room in an ecological habitat, guests are given the opportunity to experience birdlife in close proximity, finding themselves in the epicenter of nature.

“I got to spend a few days and nights in some of the Treehotel rooms right before the pandemic, and left with a sense of rejuvenation from complete immersion into nature. I couldn’t help wondering if there was a way to take the immersion one step further - and almost instantly the idea of inviting not only the human visitors but also the resident bird and bat population to cohabit a spherical swarm of nests came to life. After our first conversations with Ulf Öhman from Norrbotten Ornithological Association we were relieved to learn that birds don’t drop where they nest - so there is hope for the glass to remain clear within this cloud of aviary architecture.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & creative director, BIG

“We designed our addition to the Treehotel - the Biosphere - to create a unique experience for hotel guests, which takes inspiration from the qualities of the surrounding forest and absorbs them into the interior. The ecology is the driver behind the architectural expression.”

João Albuquerque — Partner, BIG

Bjarke Ingels Angel Barreno Gutiérrez Eszter Oláh Geoffrey Eberle Pawel Marjanski Ragna Nordstrom João Albuquerque Francisco Abajo Duran

COLLABORATORS

Ulf Öhman
Chairman of the Norrbotten Ornithological Association
Ateljé Lyktan
Vittjärvshus

CopenHill Amager Bakke

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

CopenHill

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

2019

CLIENT

Amager Resource Center | Amager Bakke Foundation

TYPOLOGY

Infrastructure

SIZE M2/FT2

41,000 / 441,324

STATUS

COMPLETED

Located in an industrial area near Copenhagen city center, CopenHill, also known as Amager Bakke, is an exemplary model in the field of waste management and energy production, as well as an architectural landmark in the cityscape of Copenhagen. The building replaces the 50-year-old Amagerforbraending plant and is the single largest environmental initiative in Denmark.

 

The new breed of waste-to-energy plant is topped with a ski slope, hiking trail, climbing wall, an urban recreation center, and environmental education hub, turning the power plant into a destination. The building embodies BIG’s notion of hedonistic sustainability while contributing to Copenhagen’s goal of becoming one of the world’s first carbon-neutral cities.

Located on the industrial waterfront of Amager, where raw industrial facilities have become the site for extreme sports – from wakeboarding to go-kart racing – the new power plant adds skiing, hiking, and rock climbing to the area. Expert skiers can ski down the artificial Olympic half-pipe length ski slope all year round, test the freestyle park, or try the timed slalom course, while beginners and kids practice on the lower slopes. Skiers ascend the park from the platter lift, carpet lifts, or glass elevator with views inside the 24-hour waste incineration process.

 

CopenHill’s continuous façade features 1.2 m tall and 3.3 m-wide aluminum boxes stacked like gigantic bricks overlapping with each other. In between, glazed windows allow daylight to reach deep inside the facility, while larger openings on the southwest façade illuminate workstations on the administrative floors.

The public can enjoy the rooftop bar, cross-fit area, or the highest observation deck in the city before descending the 490 m tree-lined hiking and running trail within the lush, mountainous terrain. The 10,000 m2 green roof, 85 m high up in the air, features a biodiverse landscape while absorbing heat, removing air particulates, and minimizing storm-water runoff.

 

Biologists have monitored the biodiversity of Copenhill since its inauguration in 2019. At the latest investigation in 2020, 119 different new plant and tree species were observed.

On the longest vertical façade, an 85 m climbing wall is installed making it the tallest artificial climbing wall in the world.

Beneath the slopes, whirring furnaces, steam, and turbines convert 440,000 tons of waste annually into enough clean energy to deliver electricity and district heating for 150,000 homes. The power plant’s infrastructure, from ventilation shafts to air-intakes, helps create the varied topography of a mountain; a man-made landscape created in the encounter between the needs from below and the desires from above.

 

Ten floors of administrative space are occupied by the Amager Resource Center team, including a 600 m2 education center for academic tours, workshops and sustainability conferences.

At the bottom of the ski slope, an après-ski bar welcomes locals and visitors to wind down once the boots are off. Formerly a piece of infrastructure in an industrial zone, CopenHill is now a destination for all citizens and visitors of Copenhagen.

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær David Zahle Jakob Lange Brian Yang Andreas Klok Pedersen Ole Elkjær-Larsen Blake Smith Jelena Vucic Jesper Boye Andersen Ji-Young Yoon Adam Busko Adam Mahfuh Adrien Mans Annette Jensen Alexander Codda Alvaro Garcia Mendive Anders Holden Deleuran Boris Peianov Borko Nikolic Buster Christensen Carl Pettersson Chris Falla Ella Coco Murphy Espen Vik Gonzalo Ivan Castro Vecchiola Helen Shuyang Chen Jean Valentiner Strandholt Joanna Anna Jakubowska Joanna M. Lesna Joos Jerne Kamilla Heskje Kasper Worsøe Pejtersen Kim Christensen Lars Thonke Laura Wätte Lone Fenger Albrechtsen Mads Engaard Stidsen Mathias Larsen Nanna Gyldholm Møller Richard Howis Ryohei Koike Sebastian Liszka Seunghan Yeum Tore Banke Yehezkiel Wiliardy Manik Zoltan Kalászi Gül Ertekin Alberto Cumerlato Aleksander Wadas Alexander Eising Alexandra Gustafsson Alina Tamosiunaite Anders Hjortnæs Ariel Joy Norback Wallner Armor Gutiérrez Rivas Ask Andersen Balaj Alin IIulian Brygida Zawadzka Chris Zhongtian Yuan Claus Hermansen Daniel Selensky Dennis Rasmussen Franck Fdida George Abraham Henrick Poulsen Henrik Kania Horia Spirescu Jeppe Ecklon Jing Xu Johanna Nenander Katarzyna Krystyna Siedlecka Krzysztof Piotr Marciszewski Liang Wang Lise Jessen Long Zuo Maciej Jakub Zawaszki Marcelina Kolasinska Marcos Garcia Bano Maren Allen Mathias Bank Stigsen Matti Hein Nørgaard Michael Andersen Narisara Ladawal Schröder Nicklas Antoni Rasch Oanh Nguyen Øssur Nolsø Pero Vukovic Se Hyeon Kim Simon Masson Sunming Lee Takahiro Hirayama Toni Mateu Xing Xiong Yang Zhang Jakob Ohm Laursen

AWARDS

Energy Globe National Award, 2022


World Architecture Festival Best Building of the Year Winner, 2021

World Architecture Festival Best Energy & Infrastructure Category Winner, 2021

IOC, IPC and IAKS award international architecture prize, 2021

Bundesverband GebäudeGrün Green Roof Award, 2020

IDEAT Future Award, Best Public Architecture, 2020

Popular Science Best of What’s New Award, 2020

ICONIC Awards, Innovative Architecture, Best of the Best Award, 2020

Design Educates Award, 2020

German Design Council Innovative Architecture, Best of the Best Award Winner, 2020

Architizer A+ Awards Factories & Warehouses Popular Winner, 2020

ArchDaily Building of the Year Award, Industrial Architecture, 2020

Scandinavian Green Roof Award, 2019

Architizer A+ Award, Architecture Photography, 2019

European Steel Design Award, 2017

Tekla Global BIM Awards, 2015

P/A Progressive Architecture Awards, Citation, 2015

MIPIM AR Future Projects Awards, 2012

COLLABORATORS

Detail Design:
MOE
SLA
Lüchinger+Mayer
Rambøll
Zublin
Jesper Kongshaug
BIG Ideas

Competition:
AKT
Topotek 1
Man Mad Land
Realities: United

A.P. Møller Fonden
Lokale og Anlægsfonden
Nordea Fonden
R98 Fonden
Københavns Kommune
Frederiksberg Kommune
Tårnby Kommune
Dragør Kommune
Hvidovre Kommune

Oakland Coliseum Masterplan

OAKLAND, UNITED STATES

Oakland A's Ballpark & Masterplan

OAKLAND, UNITED STATES

CLIENT

Athletics Investment Group LLC

TYPOLOGY

Sports, Urbanism

SIZE M2/FT2

44,000 / 473,612

STATUS

IDEA

BIG’s design for the A’s new home at the heart of Oakland’s revitalized waterfront seeks to return the game to its roots as the natural meeting place for the local community. An elevated tree lined promenade frames the ballpark on all sides, dipping down to meet the public square and open the field to the water and city views. The perimeter park connects a cascade of social spaces for the fans to enjoy the sport on game days and extends the urban fabric with a neighborhood park to be enjoyed all 365 days a year. In other words – bringing the “park” back in” ballpark”.

Bjarke Ingels Daniel Sundlin Agustin Perez-Torres Leon Rost Alejandra Cortes Jason Wu Guillaume Evain Isabella Marcotulli Kam Chi Cheng Max Moriyama Melissa Jones Otilia Pupezeanu Patrick Hyland Peter Sepassi Phillip Macdougall Kig Veerasunthorn Sean O'Brien Simon Scheller Stephanie Mauer Tara Abedinitafreshi Terrence Chew Tracy Sodder Xi Zhang Stephen Kwok Francesca Portesine Jeremy Alain Siegel Ashton Stare Bennett Oh Benson Chien Breno Felisbino da Silveira Catalina Rivera Rothgaenger Douglass Alligood James Caruso Jin Park Margaret Kim Mengzhu Jiang Olga Khuraskina Yeling Guo Yerin Won Yiyao Tang Yuanxun Xia Zachary Walters Ania Agnieszka Podlaszewska Ava Kim Giulia Frittoli Mike Munoz Norain Chang Thea Wiradinata Frankie Sharpe

COLLABORATORS

James Corner Field Operations
Catellus
Fehr & Peers
BKF

Superkilen

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

Superkilen

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

2012

CLIENT

Copenhagen Municipality, Realdania

TYPOLOGY

Public Realm, Sports

STATUS

COMPLETED

Superkilen is a park conceived as a giant exhibition of urban best practices. The park wedges through the Nørrebro area just north of the Copenhagen city center, creating a contrasting yet unifying space in one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in Denmark.

 

The aim of the invited competition initiated by the City of Copenhagen and Realdania Foundation back in 2005 was to create a truly unique urban space with a strong identity on a local and global scale. The park started construction in 2009 and opened to the public in June 2012.

 

A result of the collaboration between BIG + Berlin-based landscape architect firm TOPOTEK 1 and the Danish art group Superflex, the park creates a rare fusion of architecture, landscape, and art.

Superkilen is divided into three color-coded areas, each with a distinct atmospheric and functional condition: the large and expansive red square which serves as an extension of the adjacent sports hall offering a range of recreational and cultural activities; the black square as the heart of the Superkilen where locals can meet by the Moroccan fountain or a game of chess; and a linear green stretch as a natural meeting place for large-scale sports activities with vantage points over the surroundings.

 

Through an intensive curatorial process in close collaboration with the neighborhood’s residents, more than 100 objects from 60 cultures appear throughout Superkilen. Ranging from exercise equipment from Muscle Beach in LA and sewage drains from Israel, to palm trees from China and neon signs from Qatar and Russia – each object is accompanied by a small stainless plate inlaid in the ground describing the object, what it is and where it is from. The art group Superflex took the public participation further into the extreme by handpicking five groups of people and travelling to the country of their origin to document the process of selection.

“We proposed public participation as the driving force of the design leading towards the maximum freedom of expression. By transforming public procedure into proactive proposition we curated a park for the people by the people - peer to peer design - literally implemented.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

A bike path and a pedestrian path runs through the entire park, improving the infrastructure locally in the area while integrating it into the broader, citywide context. This is because the cycle route is also a part of a much longer cycle route that runs from Valby in the south, up through Frederiksberg to Lyngbyvej in the north. Today, the path is part of a 10 kmt green arc connecting the west and north side of Copenhagen.

 

"Our mission was to find the big picture in the extreme detail of a personal memory or story, which on the surface might appear insignificant, but once hunted down and enlarged became super big. A glass of Palestinian soil in a living room in Nørrebro serving as a memory of a lost land, enlarged to a small mountain of Palestinian soil in the park. A distant Mediterranean flirt in the seventies symbolized by a great iron bull, hunted down and raised on a hill in the park."

SUPERFLEX — Artist Group

Throughout the Superkilen, red maple, Japanese cherry trees, Larch, palm trees from China, and Lebanese cedar trees are planted to offer more shade and vegetative interest, augmenting the existing trees. The diversity in tree and plant species complements the diversity of the site furniture.

 

The benches within the park are like a cultural study on different countries: a Mexican seat where you can look into your neighbor’s eyes; a Belgian bench where everybody looks away from each other. Morocco has centuries of tradition celebrating water features, which we mobilized to enrich Copenhagen’s cityscape.

Bjarke Ingels Kai-Uwe Bergmann Finn Nørkjær Armen Menendian Gabrielle Nadeau Jan Magasanik Jens Majdal Kaarsholm Mikkel Marcker Stubgaard Nanna Gyldholm Møller Richard Howis Ulla Hornsyld Fan Zhang Henrick Poulsen Jan Borgstrøm Jonas Barre Nicklas Antoni Rasch Rune Hansen Takumi Iwasawa Teis Draiby Ondrej Tichy Jonas Lehmann Jennifer Dahm Petersen Lacin Karaöz Andreas Castberg

AWARDS

Aga Khan Award for Architecture, 2016


Red Dot Award for Product Design ‘Best of the Best’ Architecture & Urban Design, 2013

International Olympic Committee Award Gold Medal, 2013

Civic Trust Award International Winner, 2013

AIA Institute Honor Award for Regional & Urban Design, 2013

ArchDaily Building of the Year, 2013

Architizer A+ Awards Popular Choice Winner for Landscapes and Gardens, 2013

BDLA Prize Honorable Mention, 2013

Mies van der Rohe Award Finalist, 2013

Excellence in Economic Development Award, 2012

ARCHITECT Magazine Annual Design Review Play Category Citation, 2012

COLLABORATORS

Topotekl
Superflex
Help PR & Communication
Lemming Eriksson

The Mountain

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

The Mountain

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

2008

CLIENT

Høpfner A/S | Danish Oil Company

TYPOLOGY

Residential

SIZE M2/FT2

33,000 / 355,209

STATUS

COMPLETED

The Mountain is located in Copenhagen’s Ørestad City neighborhood and offers the best of two worlds: a close proximity to the buzzing city life in the center of Copenhagen, and the tranquility of suburban life. The Mountain is the second generation of the BIG-designed VM Houses: same client, same size, and same street. The program, however, is two thirds parking and one third living.

 

When asked to design an apartment block next to a parking garage, BIG saw an opportunity to explore a new form of symbiotic urbanism. Rather than placing a traditional slab of apartments next to a block of cars, BIG proposed mixing the two and exploiting their differences as a strength rather than a weakness: cars need large floor plates and good proximity to the street, while houses want sunlight and views. As a result, the parking is turned into a podium for the building’s 80 homes that form a stepping landscape of houses with gardens.

The Mountain consists of three radically different experiences: The Mount Everest façade, the colorful parking cathedral, and the mountain of gardens.

 

From the street, the urban façade encloses the parking. Since the parking is outdoor and naturally ventilated, the façade is perforated to let it “breathe.” By perforating the traditional aluminum plates in six different sizes, the façade creates a rasterized image of Mount Everest. What appears at close to be a pattern of transparency and opacity becomes a crystal clear image at a distance. Façade as artwork.

“The Mountain is our first built example of what we like to call Architectural Alchemy: the idea that by blending normal ingredients in surprising mixtures, we can create added value.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

The garage offers soaring views of structural beams offset with brightly colored ceilings and paintings by Copenhagen-based artist Victor Ash.

 

The roof of the parking consists of the entrance galleries to the apartments. Each floor is given a different color, creating a dynamic rainbow from green at the ground to blue in the sky: a form of industrial fresco.

The mountain of gardens is materialized in purely organic materials: wood, grass, and ivy. Each garden has a private wooden terrace where the planters and parapets create so much privacy that it becomes an extension of the home. At the edge of the garden, the wooden deck turns into turf, at which point the gardens become a part of diagonal collective space across the different levels.

 

All rainwater is collected in a central tank and redistributed to the planters in dry seasons. A mix of more than 20 different plants that blossom at different times of the year turn the south façade into a living hillside changing with the seasons. A façade composed of the life of plants and people.

The Mountain is a hybrid combining the splendors of a suburban lifestyle: a house with a big garden where children can play, with the metropolitan qualities of a penthouse view and a dense urban location.

 

The apartments are transformed into a mountain of homes covered in green. The parking is transformed into a cathedral of car culture, with generous ceiling heights, light, and air. Rather than traditional parking, it has become a new form of public space for concerts, mountain bikes, and parkour athletes.

Bjarke Ingels Finn Nørkjær Leon Rost Jakob Lange Ole Elkjær-Larsen Annette Jensen David Vega y Rojo João Vieira Costa Dennis Rasmussen Henrick Poulsen Jan Borgstrøm Karsten Hammer Hansen Wataru Tanaka Dariusz Bojarski Eva Hviid-Nielsen Jørn Jensen Karsten V. Vestergaard Louise Steffensen Matte Rosenquist Ole Nannberg Mia Frederiksen Roberto Rosales Salazar Rong Bin Sophys Sobye Soren Lambertsen Malte Rosenquist

AWARDS

Jørn Utzon Statuette Concrete Element Award, 2011


Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award, 2009

Urban Land Institute Award for Excellence, 2009

MIPIM Award, Best Housing, 2009

Forum Aid Award for Best Nordic Architecture, 2008

World Architecture Festival Best Housing Category Winner, 2008

Træprisen Danish Wood Award, 2008

Mies van der Rohe Award Honourable Mention, 2009

COLLABORATORS

Julien De Smedt / PLOT
Moe & Brødsgaard

Education Esbjerg Masterplan & Building Design

ESBJERG, DENMARK

Education Esbjerg

ESBJERG, DENMARK

CLIENT

Education Esbjerg

TYPOLOGY

Education

SIZE M2/FT2

90,573 / 974,919

STATUS

IN DESIGN

BIG’s Landscape, Engineering, Architecture and Planning teams come together to give form to the future of education, business and living in the Wadden Sea on the west coast of Denmark. The masterplan for Education Esbjerg – a new educational institution and campus on the island of Esbjerg Strand is informed entirely by the site’s environmental parameters: the noise from the nearby ship recycling yard and offshore rigs, dominant westerly winds, high tides, storm surges and sunlight.

 

Rather than separate buildings spread across the island, this superblock is an entire neighborhood in one continuous 90,000 m2 building, where all interior spaces have park views, sea views, or both! Public promenades on the ground and on the roof invite life into the area and create a lively destination for both locals and visitors.

Bjarke Ingels David Zahle Jakob Sand Catherine Huang Ole Elkjær-Larsen Anders Holden Deleuran Andrea Hektor Andy Coward Katrine Juul Malka Logo Nanna Gyldholm Møller Per Bo Madsen Tore Banke Viktoria Millentrup Vilius Jokubaitis Zuzanna Eugenia Montwill Giulia Frittoli Ian Law Jiewei Li Jenna Hukkinen Bo Kuiper Karim Daw Eleanor Gibson Edward Durie Natalia Politano Helena Hammershaimb Alejandro Di Napoli Castañeda Peter Andres Ehvert Tim Christensen

COLLABORATORS

Voluntas
Ramboll
Mir
Quantum

Claremont McKenna College

CLAREMONT, UNITED STATES

Claremont McKenna College

CLAREMONT, UNITED STATES

CLIENT

Claremont McKenna College

TYPOLOGY

Education

SIZE M2/FT2

10,842 / 116,700

STATUS

IN CONSTRUCTION

In September 2022, Claremont McKenna College – one of the top U.S. liberal arts colleges – broke ground on its 135, 000 SF Robert Day Sciences Center. It will be home for the College’s next-generation Kravis Department of Integrated Sciences – a powerful, multi-disciplinary, computational approach to advance gene, brain, and climate knowledge. 

 

Expected to be completed in 2024, the Robert Day Sciences Center launches a series of campus developments and improvements to prepare Claremont McKenna for its next chapter, and represents an educational evolution in how the College will prepare its students – one that deliberately and coherently integrates sciences and computation with the humanities and social sciences to address big thematic priorities in scientific discovery and application. 

The building’s structure is designed as a stack of two volumes, or rectangle ‘blocks’ – two per floor – with each pair rotated 45 degrees from the floor below. On the interior, each individual volume is expressed as a rectangular wood-clad truss on the long edges, and as a floor-to-ceiling glass facade on the shorter sides. The continual rotation of each floor creates a sky-lit, central atrium at the heart of the building that provides direct views into classrooms and research spaces from all levels.

 

Students, professors, staff, and visitors will be able to access the new center from two main entrances – at the ground floor and the first floor – located at different elevations due to the north-south slope of the campus. Students entering through the south side will be met by a cafe and the open auditorium’s grand staircase that leads up towards the atriumThe full-height atrium with open spaces invite collaborative activity – embodying both the architectural and educational approach of the center.  

 

“We are seeing the confluence of previously distinct disciplines: breakthroughs in computer and data science lead to breakthroughs in the natural and life sciences. As a consequence, we need to provide spaces for the integration of these previously siloed sciences. The architecture for the new Robert Day Sciences Center’s seeks to maximize this integration and interaction. The labs and classrooms are stacked in a Jenga-like composition framing a column-free, open internal space with the freedom and flexibility to adapt the ever-evolving demands of technology and science. Each level of the building is oriented towards a different direction of the campus, channeling the flow of people and ideas internally between the labs and the classrooms as well as externally between the integrated sciences and the rest of the campus. It is our hope that the building will not only provoke new conversations between scientists but that it may also stimulate the rest of the liberal arts students to take a deeper interest in the sciences and vice versa. The analytical embracing the experimental – rationality intersecting with creativity.”

Bjarke Ingels — Founder & Creative Director, BIG

The instructional and research spaces are organized around the perimeter of the building – providing classrooms with picturesque views while keeping the quieter instructional spaces farther away from the more social atrium. Overall, the interior’s materiality is defined by the contrast of the warm wood-clad beams, concrete floors, and the functional double-duty surfaces found within the integrated sciences labs.  

Eight outdoor roof terraces located on the corner perimeters of each bar offer sweeping 360-degree views of the mountains to the north, the campus to the west, and the Roberts Campus to the east. Designed with a mix of hardscape and softscape areas featuring native plantingsthese “green roof spaces are multi functional, designed to be used for outdoor classrooms, study areas, or places to meet classmates and professors. 

 

Approximately 9,000 SF of solar panels on the Robert Day Sciences Center roof will provide between 200-230 megawatt hours of energy production per year. 

“Today more than ever, an interdisciplinary approach to the sciences is vital to tackling the world’s biggest challenges such as health, climate, and misinformation. By literally stacking disciplines together, the building becomes an expression of collaboration and a crossroads for scientific thought. The parallel wings extend the historical framework of the campus mall, then pivot diagonally to face the future of the CMC campus expansion.”

Leon Rost — Partner, BIG

With views of Mt. Baldy, the building is positioned on the eastern edge of Claremont McKenna College, at the corner of Ninth Street and Claremont Boulevard – creating a strong gateway to the campus. This strategic position will facilitate strong connections to other academic departments on campus.

Bjarke Ingels Beat Schenk Leon Rost Alana Goldweit Alvaro Velosa Amir Mikhaeil Aran Coakley David Iseri David Holbrook Florencia Kratsman Gary Polk Jamie Maslyn Larson Jan Leenknegt Kam Chi Cheng Kelly Neill Ken Chongsuwat Lorenz Krisai Marcus Wilford Melody Hwang Minjung Ku Neha Sadruddin Peter Sepassi Ryan Duval Seung Ho Shin Sue Biolsi Terrence Chew Thomas McMurtrie Tracy Sodder Won Ryu Bella Yanan Ding Alex Wu Emily Chen Carlos Castillo Casey Tucker Chris Tron Christopher Pin Dylan Hames Francesca Portesine Bernardo Schuhmacher Douglass Alligood Jose Lacruz Vela Gus Steyer Montre'ale Jones Ana Luisa Pedreira Ololade Owolabi Ahmad Tabbakh Bianca Blanari Yasamin Mayyas

COLLABORATORS

Saiful Bouquet
Acco Engineered Systems
Atlas Civil Design
LRM Landscape Architecture
Rosendin Electric
WSP USA
Jacobs
ARUP
KGM Architectural Lighting
Heintges
KOA
EWCG
KPRS

120 Fleet Street

LONDON, ENGLAND

120 Fleet Street

LONDON, ENGLAND

CLIENT

Chinese Estates Holdings | CO-RE

TYPOLOGY

Work

SIZE M2/FT2

75,000 / 807,300

STATUS

IN CONSTRUCTION

Located in the heart of the City of London, the 120 Fleet Street redevelopment will create a landmark that will be a catalyst for the revitalization of the Fleet Street neighborhood.

 

The project includes the restoration of the Daily Express Building grade II* listed building. The headquarters of the newspaper – once the epicenter of the newspaper industry and one of London’s finest Art Deco interiors – will for the first time in its history be given a stand-alone status. The project will provide inclusive public access to the original art deco lobby, as well as the exterior roof amenities that include views of the surrounding city.

The new building will have a strong civic presence on Fleet Street. Its layered appearance alleviates its scale by recessing its upper stories and creating a naturally thin, tall peak at the star junction of Shoe Lane Plaza while addressing the different urban contextual settings.

“Our design for 120 Fleet Street is informed by optimism and confidence in the future of the City of London as a world-class centre of commerce and culture. A workplace that responds to its setting in the City and its setting in the 21st Century, with equal measure.”

Andy Young — Partner, BIG

The geometry of the design results in south-facing cascading green terraces offering direct visual and physical access to lush outdoor greenery.

The building includes flexible workspaces with a full-height perimeter glazed-façade – maximizing daylight and offering panoramic views towards historic landmarks such as World Heritage St Paul’s Cathedral, Old Bailey, St Brides and the Royal Courts of Justice. 120 Fleet Street embeds strong environmental credentials geared to meet the benchmarks set out by Whole Life Carbon and Circular Economy principles to reduce the embodied carbon of the development.

Bjarke Ingels Andreas Klok Pedersen Florencia Kratsman Linqi Dong Francesca Portesine Ahad Aman Sheikh Anna Pazurek Andy Young Boni Yuen Danai Haratsis Harry George Andrews Ioannis Gio Isabelle Doumet Isabel da Silva Lauren Connell Falla Lorenzo Boddi Luciana Bondio Ludmila Majernikova Marcos Anton Banon Marina Cogliani Matilde Tavanti Mike Yin Pierre-Edouard Joseph Joiris de Caussin Richard Keys Song Jie Lim Stefan Plugaru Vid Znidarsic Vincent Katienin Konate Ania Agnieszka Podlaszewska Ola Sobczyk Jakob Freek Engstrom Mohamad Ayham Kabbani Juan Carpio Sanchez Olga Korolkova Ioana Adelina Popescu Ioannis Saravelos Vidal Fernandez Diez Clara Veci Jonatan Zisser Tertius Mwangela Cristina Garau Zaforteza Eric Jung Maria Hernandez Enriquez

COLLABORATORS

Arup
Chapman BDSP
DP9

Vancouver House

VANCOUVER, CANADA

Vancouver House

VANCOUVER, CANADA

2020

CLIENT

Westbank Projects Corporation

TYPOLOGY

Residential

SIZE M2/FT2

60,758 / 654,000

STATUS

COMPLETED

Vancouver House is located at the main entrance to Vancouver right where Granville bridge triforks when it reaches downtown. The resulting triangular slices of land had remained undeveloped until now. When engaged by Westbank to design a residential high-rise for the highly complex site, BIG started by mapping the constraints: setbacks from the streets; a 30 m setback from the bridge; and a neighboring park had to be protected from shadows. After all the constraints, a small triangular site nearly too small to build on was left.

 

The 30 m separation from the bridge was defined as a minimum distance until the building reached 30 m up in the air, after which it could grow back out, allowing BIG to double the floor plate. The Vancouver House emerges from the ground, expands as it rises, appearing like a Genie let out of the bottle. What seems like a surreal gesture is in fact a highly responsive architecture – shaped by its environment.

Underneath the bridge, Vancouver artist Rodney Graham and BIG envisioned what we nicknamed the Sistine Chapel of street art: an art gallery turned upside down which would turn the negative impact of the bridge into a positive. This includes a gigantic Spinning Chandelier suspended above the street.

Bjarke Ingels Thomas Christoffersen Beat Schenk Agustin Perez-Torres Agne Rapkeviciute Aran Coakley Tran Le Blake Smith Carl Macdonald Florencia Kratsman Jan Leenknegt Julie Kaufman Kam Chi Cheng Kelly Neill Lorenz Krisai Otilia Pupezeanu Phillip Macdougall Sean Franklin Shu Zhao Simon Scheller Terrence Chew Thomas Smith Won Ryu Alex Wu Chris Tron Deb Campbell Elnaz Rafati Francesca Portesine Gabriel Jewell-Vitale Ivy Hume Aaron Mark Agnieszka Majkowska Alan Tansey Amina Blacksher Arash Adel Ahmadian Armen Menendian Barbora Srpkova Benjamin Johnson Benjamin Novacinski Benjamin Zunkeler Bennett Gale Birk Daugaard Brian Foster Brian Rome Carolien Schippers Christopher Junkin Christopher Malcolm Jr. David Brown Davide Maggio Douglass Alligood Doug Stechschulte Edward Yung Elena Bresciani Ella Coco Murphy Ema Hristova Bakalova Filip Milovanovic Gabriel Hernandez Solano Gaurav Janey Hector Garcia-Castrillo Janice Rim John Kim Jonas Swienty Andresen Kurt Nieminen Lauren Turner Lucio Santos Marcella Martinez Matthew Dlugosz Melissa Bauld Michael Evola Paula Domka Spencer Hayden Taylor Fulton Terrence Lallak Tianqi Zhang Tobias Hjortdal Ute Rinnebach Valentina Mele Xinyu Wang Yaziel Juarbe Yoanna Shivarova Zachary Walters Zhifei Xu Alexandra Gustafsson Alina Tamosiunaite Benjamin Caldwell David Dottelonde Dong-Joo Kim Josiah Poland Julian Liang Julianne Gola Karol Bogdan Borkowski Megan Ng Michael Robert Taylor Ryan Yang Sebastian Grogaard

AWARDS

AFBC Architecture Awards of Excellence, 2021


AZ Award Best Multi-unit Residential, 2021

CTBUH Structural Engineering, 2021

CTBUH Best Tall Hotel / Residential Building, 2021

CTBUH Best Tall Building 100m – 199m, 2021

CTBUH Best Tall Building World Wide, 2021

CTBUH Award of Excellence Winner, 2021

Canadian Architect Award of Excellence Finalist, 2015

World Architecture Festival Future Project of the Year, 2015

World Architecture Festival Future Best Housing Category Winner, 2015

Re-thinking the Future Award 1st Place for Mixed-Use Concept, 2014

MIPIM AR Future Projects Awards Highly Commended, 2014

WAN Awards Residential Sector Winner, 2012

COLLABORATORS

Dialog
Integral Group
PFS Studio
Buro Happold
Glotman Simpson
Nemetz & Associates
LMDG
Morrison Hershfield
BVDA Facade Engineering
HLB Lighting Design
James KM Cheng Architects
Icon Pacific

The Spiral

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

The Spiral

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

CLIENT

Tishman Speyer

TYPOLOGY

Work

SIZE M2/FT2

264,775 / 2,850,014

STATUS

IN CONSTRUCTION

Located at the intersection of the elevated High Line park and the newly developed Hudson Boulevard Park on Manhattan’s new western frontier, The Spiral extends the green space of the former train tracks in a spiraling motion towards the sky – from High Line to the skyline.

 

The 1,005 ft high-rise is a unique hybrid that intertwines a continuous green pathway with workspaces on every level. The building sets a new standard for the contemporary workplace, where nature becomes an integrated part of the work environment while spatial features are continuously adaptable to the changing needs of the tenants and their organizations. 

The first zoning resolution in 1916 transformed NYC’s skyline. It required all towers to stay within a diagonal sky exposure plane, ensuring light and air could reach the streets. This resulted in the iconic NYC “wedding cakes” which still dominate the skyline today.

 

The stepping form of The Spiral echoes the architecture of New York City’s classic stepped setback skyscrapers and is the natural evolutionary step in the Tishman Speyer portfolio.

 

The building’s silhouette resonates with the iconic architecture of Rockefeller Center while its modern materials and detailing place it at the forefront of contemporary high-rise design on a path to become a future classic on the Manhattan skyline.